AET 275 Architectural Design: Foundation Studies I


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Dover, Stanton
Effective Date:
2020-51
Prerequisite:
AET 125, AET 164
Co-Requisites:
None
Course Credits and Hours:
4.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
3.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course is an introduction to the design process using abstract and applied projects in three-dimensional (3D) form to investigate the relationship among scale, context, and building elements. It includes the impact of function, materials, and structure on the design process in creating architecture.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Video Conferencing
Web Conferencing
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Develop solutions to 3D design problems. (CCC 2, 5, 6; PGC 3, 5, 6)
  2. Select an architect for design inspiration. (CCC 2, 4, 5; PGC 3, 6)
  3. Combine both practical and aesthetic aspects of architectural design. (CCC 1, 2, 4, 5, 6; PGC 2, 3, 6)
  4. Integrate human concerns into design solutions. (CCC 1, 2, 4, 5, 6; PGC 3, 4, 5, 6)
  5. Use architectural programs as the basis for design solutions. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC 3, 5, 6)
  6. Prepare graphic and 3D studies to document the design process. (CCC 2, 5, 6; PGC 3, 5, 6)
  7. Participate in discussion, collaboration, and criticism with others. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5; PGC 3, 5, 6)
  8. Use written communication to clarify design parameters, concepts, and goals. (CCC 1, 2,4, 5; PGC 5, 6)
  9. Use standard published references and other available sources that document architectural design work. (CCC 2, 4, 5, 6; PGC 3, 4)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Develop solutions to 3D design problems.
    1. Illustrate the primary elements of visual design such as language, organization, and expression of form to include point, line, plane, solid, void, symmetry/asymmetry, organizational systems, line, tone, texture, and color.
    2. Design compositions that explore the relationship of parts, shapes, and the solid-void relationships of architectural space.
    3. Propose creative solutions through the assembly of architectural models that demonstrate the relationships of solid parts and the spaces surrounding solid parts.
  2. Select an architect for design inspiration.
    1. Research past and present architects.
    2. Examine and identify elements of the selected architect’s designs and theory.
  3. Combine both practical and aesthetic aspects of architectural design.
    1. Identify and explain practical aspects of architectural design.
    2. Define aesthetics, specifically as applied to architecture and architectural design.
    3. Identify and define aesthetic aspects of architectural design.
    4. Combine both practical and aesthetic aspects in a design solution.
  4. Integrate human concerns into design solutions.
    1. Identify and discuss anthropometric, ergonomic, social, psychological, behavioral, and other human interactions with the built environment.
    2. Design for human concerns, both explicit and implicit, while meeting project requirements.
  5. Use architectural programs as the basis for design solutions.
    1. Examine, categorize, and organize the requirements of a program.
    2. Design and assemble an architectural solution to satisfy program requirements.
    3. Justify the design solution with reference to the program requirements.
  6. Prepare graphic and 3D studies to document the design process.
    1. Propose solutions to design problems using diagrammatic, pictorial, orthographic, and axonometric drawings as well as physical and virtual models.
    2. Create graphic and 3D sketch studies to document the evolution of the design process from search for concept to completed solution.
    3. Prepare a preliminary presentation based on sketches, drawings, and physical and virtual models.
    4. Produce a final presentation based on fully developed sketches, drawings, renderings, and physical and virtual models.
  7. Participate in discussion, collaboration, and criticism with others.
    1. Participate in discussion and collaboration in the evolution of design solutions from inception to completion.
    2. Engage in criticizing design solutions, both informally and formally.
  8. Use written communication to clarify design parameters, concepts, and goals.
    1. Research and prepare a report on a selected architect.
    2. Write a summary of design processes, concepts, and goals.
  9. Use standard published references and other available sources that document architectural design work.
    1. Use existing architectural designs to inform possible approaches to design problems.
    2. Use architectural books, texts, magazines, and references to research design issues and to guide design solutions.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

Architectural Poster (formative)

15%

Theory Cube (formative)

15%

Theory Path (summative)

15%

Residential Design Project (summative)

40%

Portfolio Presentation (summative)

15%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Research and analyze existing site conditions.
  2. Apply principles of sustainability to the built environment.
  3. Employ the architectural design process.
  4. Interpret and apply building codes.
  5. Create technical drawings and presentation graphics.
  6. Demonstrate a commitment to quality, timeliness, professional development and continuous improvement.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.