ASL 101 American Sign Language I


Campus Location:
Stanton, Wilmington
Effective Date:
2020-51
Prerequisite:
SSC 100 or concurrent
Co-Requisites:
None
Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
0.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course introduces the foundation of American Sign Language (ASL).  Students develop visual and gestural abilities to learn and produce simple communications.  Topics include American deaf culture.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Demonstrate correct use of fingerspelling and numbers in ASL. (CCC 1, 2)
  2. Use correct non-manual signals. (CCC 1, 5)
  3. Formulate grammatically correct ASL questions and sentence structures including topic comment, yes/no questions, wh-questions, rhetorical questions, directionality, use of space, negation, classifiers, conditionals, and age sequenced ordering. (CCC 1, 5)
  4. Communicate appropriately in ASL, including the use of culturally appropriate behaviors. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5)
  5. Build a conversation with other students and deaf people in ASL. (CCC 1, 2, 3)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Demonstrate correct use of fingerspelling and numbers in ASL.
    1. Formulate correct handshape, location, orientation, and movement when fingerspelling and using number signs.
    2. Recognize fingerspelled names.
    3. Locate in text written names when fingerspelled.
    4. Count with the numbers 1 –100 in ASL.
  2. Use correct non-manual signals.
    1. Demonstrate how to use non-manual signals.
    2. Use correct non-manual signals when asking and answering questions.
    3. Formulate correct non-manual signals when giving directions.
  3. Formulate grammatically correct ASL questions and sentence structures, including topic comment, yes/no questions, wh-questions, rhetorical questions, directionality, use of space, negation, classifiers, conditionals, and age sequenced ordering.
    1. Ask and formulate any type of question using yes/no questions, wh-questions, and rhetorical questions with appropriate non-manual signals and head/body movements
    2. Demonstrate in ASL giving directions to several different locations.
    3. Demonstrate in ASL the use of topic comment, classifiers, conditionals, and age sequenced ordering.
    4. Use directionality, space, and negation appropriately in ASL.
    5. Demonstrate contrastive structure, referents, classifiers, and non-manual signals appropriately in ASL sentence structure.
  4. Communicate appropriately in ASL, including the use of culturally appropriate behaviors.
    1. Express what they want.
    2. Identify themselves as a deaf, hard of hearing, or hearing student.
    3. Name their college, school, and instructors.
    4. Identify other people and their family members.
    5. Use possessive signs when describing family relationships.
  5. Build a conversation with other students and deaf people in ASL.
    1. Carry on a conversation in ASL.
    2. Begin a conversation with appropriate greetings and conversation openers, including waving at the person or touching the person on the shoulder or arm.
    3. Demonstrate several different ways to begin a conversation, and continue it using appropriate pragmatic techniques in ASL.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

Formative:  Homework

5%

Summative:  Deaf Community Interaction Paper

5%

Formative:  Quizzes

25%

Summative:  Presentation

10%

Summative:  Exams (2) (equally weighted)

50%

Formative: Class Participation

5%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

None

Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.