ASL 102 American Sign Language II


Campus Location:
Stanton, Wilmington
Effective Date:
2020-51
Prerequisite:
ASL 101, SSC 100 or concurrent
Co-Requisites:
None
Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
0.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course broadens students’ conversational skills, including talking about themselves, other people, activities, giving directions, and making requests. Students continue to develop communicative skills as well as increase their knowledge about the deaf culture and community.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Narrate a complete story using specified American Sign Language (ASL) structures, including non-manual markers, contrastive structure, reference points, and classifiers. (CCC 1, 2, 3)
  2. Use gestures, descriptions, locatives, instrumental classifiers, correct spatial referencing, eye gaze, and contrastive structure. (CCC 1, 5)
  3. Make requests, give directions, and describe others in ASL, including the use of non-manual markers. (CCC 1, 2, 5)
  4. Develop polite conversation strategies to handle interruptions, including those due to sounds in the environment. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5)
  5. Communicate in ASL to identify others, and give appropriate information to establish connections. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5)
  6. Integrate numbers into sentences in ASL. (CCC 1, 2)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Narrate a complete story using specified American Sign Language (ASL) structures, including non-manual markers, contrastive structure, reference points, and classifiers.
    1. Use time markers to indicate verb tense.
    2. Maintain the use of non-manual markers throughout the conversation.
    3. Use one’s non-dominant hand to establish reference points.
    4. Use verb inflections and contrastive structures in giving commands and reasons and making requests.
  2. Use gestures, descriptions, locatives and instrumental classifiers, correct spatial referencing, eye gaze, and contrastive structure.
    1. Express likes, wants, and needs, and ask how to get somewhere.
    2. Use gestures and non-manual markers to get needs met without resorting to fingerspelling.
    3. Demonstrate the use of descriptive classifiers to describe furniture or objects in a room.
    4. Demonstrate how to describe personal qualities and characteristics by using a brief description of the physical appearance or actions of a person, using contrastive structure, and non-manual markers to express a variety of opinions.
  3. Make requests, give directions, and describe others in ASL, including the use of non-manual markers.
    1. Express opinions using non-manual markers and be able to give reasons why.
    2. Make excuses and negotiate plans, including accepting and declining invitations using non-manual markers.
    3. Give directions to locations on the same and other floors.
    4. Give general and specific directions to locations from one area to another.
    5. Express the degree of certainty/uncertainty.
    6. Demonstrate several different phrases that are used to make requests depending on the level of formality (register variation).
    7. Demonstrate how to complain, make requests, and offer assistance, make offers, accept or decline offers.
    8. Describe pets, including opinions about them.
  4. Develop polite conversation strategies to handle interruptions, including those due to sounds in the environment.
    1. Use one-handed signing to respond and communicate during interruptions.
    2. Ask or give information, and use attention-getting behaviors.
  5. Communicate in ASL to identify others, and give appropriate information to establish connections.
    1. Describe hair, faces, racial identity, height, body type, and shoulder size.
    2. Emphasize distinguishing characteristics between people.
    3. Describe style and patterns in clothing.
    4. Exchange information about siblings or children, and establish relationships in the family.
    5. Use dual pronominal signs.
    6. Demonstrate different signs related to occupations, and describe a job.
    7. Confirm, qualify, and contradict people’s opinions.
  6. Integrate numbers into sentences in ASL.
    1. Count the numbers 26-100.
    2. Use ordinal numbers for each floor of a building, other places, or objects.
    3. Use numbers in multiples.
    4. Use monetary numbers from one cent to one dollar.
    5. Use the rocking number form for 67, 68, 69, 78, 79, 89 and 98, 97, 96, 87, 86, and 76.
    6. Use numbers representing age, rankings, and the list principle.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

Formative:  Class Participation

10%

Formative:  Homework:  Receptive Skills

10%

Formative:  Deaf Community Interaction Paper

5%

Summative: Video Projects (2) (equally weighted)

20%

Formative:  Quizzes

30%

Summative: Final Exam

25%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

None

Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.