BIO 106 Basic Nutrition Concepts


Campus Location:
Stanton
Effective Date:
2020-51
Prerequisite:
None
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
1.00 credits
1.00 lecture hours/week
0.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

In this course, students learn the basic nutrition concepts that can be applied to everyday life in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle and well-being.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Identify a healthful diet. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6)
  2. Discuss how food plays a role in the health of the human body. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6)
  3. Identify the major nutrients, their functions in the human body, dietary sources, and their importance in health. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6)
  4. Understand portion control and calorie intake. (CCC 1, 2, 4, 5, 6)
  5. Formulate a balanced diet (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
  6. Complete a self-assessment. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6)
  7. Use food labels and ChooseMyPlate to design a personalized healthy meal plan for daily use. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6)
  8. Understand the role of physical fitness and how it relates to nutrition in maintaining health. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Identify a healthful diet.
    1.   Define nutrition.
    2.   Differentiate between a healthy and unhealthy diet. 
    3.   Use food labels and ChooseMyPlate to identify food categories.
    4.   Interpret and list the components of each food category.
    5.   Discuss how serving sizes play a role in a balanced diet.
    6.   Summarize daily serving requirements of each nutrient.
  2. Discuss how food plays a role in the health of the human body.
    1. Compare malnutrition, undernutrition, and overnutrition in relation to the human body.
    2. List the four leading causes of death that are related to diet.
    3. List common lifestyle elements associated with optimal quality of life.
    4. Discuss the nutrients needed for human body functions.
    5. List health risks associated with being overweight.
    6. Propose a meal plan that reduces risk of disease.
    7. Discuss eating behaviors and risk of disease.
    8. Compare food intolerance and food allergy.
    9. List the three main groupings of disorders related to specific foods.
  3. Identify the major nutrients, their functions in the human body, dietary sources, and their importance in health.
    1. State the nutrients needed for human body functions.
    2. Identify the function of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and amino acids, vitamins, water, and minerals in the human body.
    3. List dietary sources of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and amino acids, vitamins, water, and minerals.
    4. Discuss the importance of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and amino acids, vitamins, water, and minerals in health.
  4. Understand portion control and caloric intake.
    1. Identify what a portion is.
    2. Define calorie, empty calorie, nutrient dense, and energy dense.
    3. List the caloric values of 1 gram of carbohydrate, fat, and protein.
    4. Calculate total calories.
    5. List ways to control portion sizes and caloric intake.
    6. Assess portion equivalencies.
  5. Formulate strategies of a healthy diet.
    1. Differentiate between a healthy and unhealthy diet.
    2. Recognize and improve unhealthy meal plans.
    3. Discuss techniques for healthy food preparation, storage, and cooking.
    4. List alternative methods for healthier food preparation and cooking.
    5. Differentiate between healthy and unhealthy food choices when shopping.
    6. Discuss healthy shopping strategies.
  6. Complete a self-assessment.
    1. Determine individual life expectancy.
    2. Complete an online nutritional and physical activity assessment.
    3. Create a personal diet strategy.
    4. Complete an assessment of BMI and body fat composition.
    5. Calculate total energy requirements.
    6. Analyze self-assessment and determine necessary improvements to personal diet.
  7. Use food labels and ChooseMyPlate to design a personalized healthy meal plan for daily use.
    1. Reconstruct an individual plan using ChooseMyPlate.
    2. Interpret food labels.
    3. Compare food labels to determine healthier choices.
    4. Identify ingredients that are least nutritious.
    5. Analyze claims that are commonly used on food labels.
  8. Understand the role of physical fitness and how it relates to nutrition in maintaining health.
    1. Explain the difference between physical activity, exercise, and physical fitness.
    2. Define four components of fitness.
    3. Discuss how each nutrient supports fitness.
    4. Discuss how many calories must be burned to lose one pound.
    5. Construct a diet that supports an active lifestyle.
    6. Define basal metabolism.
    7. Compare aerobic and anaerobic metabolism.
    8. Explain how fat distribution relates to health risks.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

Project (Summative)

60%

Web Activities and Active Learning Activity (Summative) (equally weighted)

35%

Quizzes and Assignments (Formative) (equally weighted)

5%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

None

Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.