BUS 203 Business Law


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Dover, Wilmington
Effective Date:
2020-51
Prerequisite:
BUS 101, ENG 102
Co-Requisites:
None
Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
0.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This survey course takes a general view of the United States’ legal system and topics such as tort, criminal, and constitutional law before focusing on the area of business law. Business law topics include contract formation and termination, contract enforceability, and breach of contract damages, as well as the Uniform Commercial Code. Related topics include commercial paper, agency, and property law.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Hybrid Course
Online Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Discuss elements of our nation's legal system, including court systems, criminal versus civil law, and procedures. (CCC 1; PGC – ACT 4, GBT 1, MAN 1, MKT 1)
  2. Compare and contrast elements of tort law and criminal law. (CCC 1, 2; PGC – ACT 4, GBT 1, MAN 1, MKT 1)
  3. Describe the elements of a contract, and apply those elements to sample cases. (CCC 1, 2, 3; PGC – ACT 4, GBT 1, MAN 1, MKT 1)
  4. Examine the legal issues involved when something goes wrong with a contract, and apply those issues to sample cases. (CCC 1, 2, 3; PGC – ACT 4, GBT 1, MAN 1, MKT 1)
  5. Compare and contrast the common law theory of contracts with Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC).  (CCC 1, 2; PGC – ACT 4, GBT 1, MAN 1, MKT 1)
  6. Discuss the purpose and types of negotiable instruments and the significance of the Holder in Due Course (HDC) status. (CCC 1, 2; PGC – ACT 4, GBT 1, MAN 1, MKT 1)
  7. Analyze the agent-principal relationship, including liability of agent and principal to third parties. (CCC 1, 2; PGC – ACT 1, GBT 1, MAN 1, MKT 1)
  8. Distinguish between real and personal property, and discuss parties’ rights and obligations under bailments. (CCC 1, 2; PGC – ACT 4, GBT 1, MAN 1, MKT 1)
  9. Analyze business decisions applying ethical standards. (CCC 1, 2, 4; PGC –ACT 4, GBT 1, MAN 1, MKT 1)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Discuss elements of our nation's legal system including court systems, criminal versus civil law, and procedures.
    1. Discuss the need for a legal system.
    2. Discuss the primary sources of law in the United States.
    3. Trace the development of American law from English common law.
    4. Define precedent, and explain when a court might depart from a precedent.
    5. Describe the difference between remedies at law and remedies in equity.
    6. Outline the structure of the federal and state court systems in the United States.
    7. Explain the difference between a trial court and an appellate court.
    8. Explain jurisdiction and how courts apply traditional jurisdictional concepts to cases involving Internet transactions.
    9. Describe the Bill of Rights and the freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment.
    10. Discuss the constitutional clause that gives the federal government the power to regulate commercial activities among the various states.
    11. Evaluate alternative ways to settle disputes between two or more parties other than by litigation (a lawsuit).
  2. Compare and contrast elements of tort law and criminal law.
    1. Compare the procedures in a civil action and a criminal action.
    2. Discuss the differences between civil law and criminal law.
    3. Distinguish between a private wrong and a public wrong.
    4. Discuss the types of legal wrongs, both criminal and civil.
    5. Define tort and the purpose of tort law.
    6. Explain the categories of torts.
    7. Describe the elements of negligence.
    8. Describe product liability, strict liability, and defenses to product liability.
    9. Explain the two elements that must exist before a person can be held liable for a crime.
    10. Explain how a corporation can be liable for crimes.
    11. Differentiate the crimes that harm businesses from the crimes that are committed by businesses.
    12. Explain the constitutional safeguards that exist to protect persons accused of crimes.
  3. Describe the elements of a contract, and apply those elements to example cases.
    1. Recognize the requirements of a valid contract.
    2. Distinguish the various classifications of contracts..
    3. Explain the requirements of a valid offer and acceptance, the first important elements in binding contract.
    4. Summarize the various forms of consideration, when consideration is necessary to form a binding contract, and the exceptions to the rule requiring the presence of consideration in a contract.
    5. Determine what makes parties competent to enter into a contract.
    6. Distinguish between a legal and an illegal agreement and the consequences of entering into an illegal agreement.
    7. Explain the types of contracts that are frequently required to be in writing to be enforceable, and point out the effects of failure to comply with the written requirement.
  4. Examine the legal issues involved when something goes wrong with a contract and apply those issues to example cases.
    1. Discuss the circumstances under which parties to a contract may transfer their rights and obligations.
    2. Summarize the ways in which contracts may be ended and the various remedies available to the parties for breach of contract.
    3. Discuss the difference between compensatory damages and consequential damages.
  5. Compare and contrast the common law theory of contracts with Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC).
    1. Discuss the ways in which the UCC has changed the common-law rules of contracts, especially as they relate to offer and acceptance, consideration, and the writing requirements for contracts under the statute of frauds.
    2. Apply the provisions of Article 2 of the UCC to sales.
    3. Discuss the rights and duties of the buyer and seller in a contract for the sale of goods.
    4. Explain warranty of title, express warranty, and implied warranty.
  6. Discuss the purpose and types of negotiable instruments and the significance of the Holder in Due Course (HDC) status.
    1. Relate the various types of negotiable instruments, and distinguish among the various parties involved.
    2. Describe the two major functions of negotiable instruments.
    3. Dissect the HDC concept, and explain the significance of one having the status of an HDC.
    4. Describe the legal effect of personal and real defenses on a holder in due course.
    5. Explain the bank’s responsibilities regarding stale checks, stop-payment orders, and forged or altered checks.
    6. Describe some emerging developments in the area of online banking services.
  7. Analyze the agent-principal relationship, including liability of agent and principal to third parties.
    1. Describe the ways in which employer-employee and principal-agent relationships may be created.
    2. Explain the liability of the employer or principal and the employee or agent within the relationship.
    3. Compare and contrast employee and independent contractor.
    4. Define employment-at-will doctrine.
    5. Explain federal statutes governing working hours, wages, health and safety in the workplace, and federal equal employment opportunity laws.
  8. Distinguish between real and personal property, and discuss parties’ rights and obligations under bailment.
    1. Distinguish between real and personal property.
    2. Describe the various ways in which real property and personal property can be acquired and transferred.
    3. Describe the elements necessary for an effective gift.
    4. Define a bailment, list the characteristics of a bailment, and identify the parties to a bailment.
  9. Analyze and make business decisions applying ethical standards.
    1. Differentiate between legal and ethical.
    2. Explain the relationship between business ethics and the law.
    3. Evaluate business decisions to determine if they reflect ethical and legal standards.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

4 Exams (summative) (equally weighted)

60%

Paper/Project (summative)

20%

Formative Assessments (Activities/Discussion Boards/homework exercises)

20%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

Accounting (ACT):

  1. Prepare and analyze financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.
  2. Analyze data to process information for decision-making under a product and job costing system.
  3. Apply tax laws to the preparation of tax returns and to tax plans.
  4. Integrate professional, ethical and legal standards into business practice.
  5. Employ the various theories of management and marketing in a business.

General Business (GBT):

  1. Integrate professional, ethical, and legal standards into business practice.
  2. Employ the various theories of management and marketing in a business.
  3. Apply the principles of human resource management to organizations.
  4. Evaluate the actions taken to acquire and retain customers.
  5. Measure and track financial performance of an organization.
  6. Analyze and apply the strategic management process to organizations.

Management (MAN):

  1. Integrate professional, ethical, and legal standards into business practice.
  2. Employ the various theories of management and marketing in a business.
  3. Utilize management functions, roles, and interpersonal skills to lead/manage first-level employees regardless of organizational size.
  4. Apply the principles of human resource management to organizations.
  5. Analyze and apply the strategic management process to organizations.

Marketing (MKT):

  1. Integrate professional, ethical, and legal standards into business practice.
  2. Employ the various theories of management and marketing in a business.
  3. Develop integrated sales presentations.
  4. Utilize graphic design elements to develop professional hard-copy and electronic marketing/advertising materials.
  5. Apply e-Marketing techniques to create a competitive presence.
  6. Analyze the marketing strategic planning process of an organization.
  7. Evaluate the actions taken to acquire and retain customers.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.