CEN 150 Computer Assembly & Maintenance


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Dover, Stanton
Effective Date:
2020-51
Prerequisite:
ENG 090 or concurrent, SSC 100 or concurrent
Co-Requisites:
None
Course Credits and Hours:
4.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
2.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

In this course students learn the fundamentals of supporting and troubleshooting computer hardware and software. Topics include installing and replacing major hardware components; designing and constructing complete systems; and installing, configuring, and troubleshooting various operating systems.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Hybrid Course
Online Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Explain the operation of a personal computer (PC). (CCC 1, 3,5; CEO PGC 1, EEN PGC 1, INR PGC 1)
  2. Examine and troubleshoot the major components on a motherboard. (CCC 1, 3, 5; CEO PGC 1,2,3, EEN PGC 1,2,3, INR PGC 1,2,3)
  3. Identify, explain, and troubleshoot the major components of a PC. (CCC 1, 3, 5; CEO PGC 1,2,3, EEN PGC 1,2,3, INR PGC 1,2,3)
  4. Install, configure, and maintain select operating systems and software. (CCC 1, 3, 5; CEO PGC 1,2,3, EEN PGC 1,2,3, INR PGC 1,2,3)
  5. Configure and troubleshoot basic personal computer client networks. (CCC 1, 3, 5; CEO PGC 1,2,3, EEN PGC 1,2,3, INR PGC 1,2,3)
  6. Distinguish the best security practices for operating system desktop clients. (CCC 1, 3, 5; CEO PGC 1,2,3, EEN PGC 1,2,3, INR PGC 1,2,3)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Explain the operation of a personal computer (PC).
    1. Identify all the connectors and devices on a typical PC system unit.
    2. Describe the major internal components of a PC.
    3. Relate the history of Microsoft Windows.
    4. Explain the Windows interface.
    5. Identify the operating system folders of various Windows systems.
    6. Describe the utilities in Windows that are essential to technicians.
    7. Describe the basic functions of a network, including identifying common devices and connectors.
    8. Discuss the differences between a local area network (LAN) and a wide area network (WAN) and the importance of transmission control protocol/Internet protocol (TCP/IP).
    9. Perform basic resource sharing.
  2. Examine and troubleshoot the major components on a motherboard.
    1. Identify the core components of a central processing unit (CPU).
    2. Describe the relationship of CPUs and memory.
    3. Explain the varieties of modern CPUs.
    4. Select and install a CPU.
    5. Troubleshoot CPUs.
    6. Identify the different types of dynamic random access memory (DRAM) packaging.
    7. Explain the varieties of random access memory (RAM).
    8. Select and install RAM.
    9. Perform basic RAM troubleshooting.
    10. Explain the function of basic input output system (BIOS).
    11. Distinguish among various complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) setup utility options.
    12. Describe option read-only memory (ROM) and device drivers.
    13. Troubleshoot the power-on self-test (POST).
    14. Maintain BIOS and CMOS properly.
  3. Identify, explain, and troubleshoot the major components of a PC.
    1. Describe the details about powering a PC.
    2. Install and maintain power supplies.
    3. Discuss power-supply troubleshooting and fire safety.
    4. Explain how hard drives work.
    5. Identify and explain the parallel advanced technology attachment (PATA) and serial advanced technology attachment (SATA) hard drive interfaces.
    6. Identify and explain the small computer system interface (SCSI) hard drive interfaces.
    7. Describe how to protect data with redundant array of independent disks (RAID) install hard drives.
    8. Configure CMOS and install drivers.
    9. Troubleshoot hard drive installation.
    10. Explain the partitions available in Windows.
    11. Discuss hard drive formatting options.
    12. Partition and format hard drives.
    13. Maintain and troubleshoot hard drives.
    14. Explain and install floppy disk drives.
    15. Demonstrate the variations among flash drives and other tiny drives.
    16. Identify and install optical-media technology.
    17. Troubleshoot removable media.
  4. Install, configure, and maintain select operating systems and software.
    1. Compare and contrast the most current Microsoft Windows and other operating systems, editions, and features.
    2. Describe the function of BIOS.
    3. Demonstrate the proper use of user interfaces for a given scenario.
    4. Explain the process and steps to install and configure Microsoft Windows operating systems for a given scenario.
    5. Explain the boot sequences, methods, and start-up utilities for specified Microsoft Windows operating systems.
    6. Create and administer Windows user accounts and groups.
    7. Define and use new technology file system (NTFS) permissions for authorization.
    8. Share a Windows computer securely.
    9. Secure PCs with User Account Control.
    10. Choose the appropriate commands and options to troubleshoot and resolve problems for a given scenario.
    11. Distinguish between the types and features of different Microsoft Windows operating systems directory structures.
    12. Evaluate and resolve common Microsoft Windows OS issues.
  5. Configure and troubleshoot basic personal computer client networks.
    1. Compare and contrast the different network types.
    2. List the basics of networking fundamentals, including technologies, devices, and protocols.
    3. Distinguish between the common network cables and connectors and their implementations.
    4. Discuss wireless networking components.
    5. Analyze and explain wireless networking standards.
    6. Install and configure wireless networks.
    7. Demonstrate troubleshooting client-side connectivity issues using appropriate tools for a given scenario.
  6. Distinguish the best security practices for operating system desktop clients.
    1. Explain the basic principles of personal computer security concepts and technologies.
    2. Outline the security features for wireless encryption, malicious software protection, hardware protection, password management, and biometrics.
    3. Choose the process to remove viruses and malicious software for a given scenario.
    4. Outline how to implement personal computer security and troubleshoot common security issues.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

Summative: (4) Exams (Equally weighted)

50%

Summative: (10-15) Laboratory Experiments (Equally weighted)

30%

Formative: Homework/Pop Quizzes (Equally weighted)

10%

Formative: Quizzes (Equally weighted)

10%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

EENAASCEO

  1. Perform the duties of an entry-level technician using the skills, modern tools, theory, and techniques of the electronics engineering technology.
  2. Apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to electronics engineering technology problems that require limited application of principles but extensive practical knowledge.
  3. Conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments using analysis tools and troubleshooting methods.
  4. Identify, analyze, and solve narrowly defined electronics engineering technology problems.
  5. Explain the importance of engaging in self-directed continuing professional development.
  6. Demonstrate basic management, organizational, and leadership skills which commit to quality, timeliness and continuous improvement.

EENAASEEN

  1. Perform the duties of an entry-level technician using the skills, modern tools, theory, and techniques of the electronics engineering technology.
  2. Apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to electronics engineering technology problems that require limited application of principles but extensive practical knowledge.
  3. Conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments using analysis tools and troubleshooting methods.
  4. Identify, analyze, and solve narrowly defined electronics engineering technology problems. 
  5. Explain the importance of engaging in self-directed continuing professional development.
  6. Demonstrate basic management, organizational, and leadership skills which commit to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.

EENAASINR

  1. Perform the duties of an entry-level technician using the skills, modern tools, theory, and techniques of the electronics and instrumentation engineering technology fields.
  2. Apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to electronics  and instrumentation engineering technology problems that require limited application of principles but extensive practical knowledge.
  3. Conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments using analysis tools and troubleshooting methods.
  4. Identify, analyze, and solve narrowly defined electronics and instrumentation engineering technology problems. 
  5. Explain the importance of engaging in self-directed continuing professional development.
  6. Demonstrate basic management, organizational, and leadership skills which commit to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.