CET 247 Route Surveying and Design


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Stanton
Effective Date:
2018-52
Prerequisite:
ENG 102, CET 125, CET 144, EDD 171
Co-Requisites:

none

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
2.00 lecture hours/week
3.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course introduces fundamental principles of highway and road design to include safety, speed, terrain, and operating volumes as they apply to roadway width, side slopes curvature, and gradient. Design problems include horizontal curves, compound curves; cross-section areas and volumes; vertical curves and alignments.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

Surveying field book for data entry, Civil Engineers Scale

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Solve fundamental problems dealing with superelevation, friction, sight distance, stopping distance, and response-initiation time. (CCC 2, 3, 6; PGC: CET 1; SET 1
  2.  Compute volumes of earthwork related to route design and construction.  (CCC 2, 6; PGC: CET 1; SET 1, 3)
  3. Interpret field data associated with preliminary route location and slope staking.  (CCC 2, 6; PGC: CET 1, 2; SET 1, 5)
  4. Perform a preliminary route survey and slope staking calculation.  (CCC 3, 6; PGC CET 1, 2; SET 1, 5)
  5. Compute the principal lengths of parts of a circular curve along with the field book data for laying out the curve. (CCC 2, 3, 6; PGC: CET 1; SET 1)
  6. Lay out a circular curve in the field. (CCC 1, 2, 6; PGC CET 1, 2; SET 1, 5)
  7. Solve route surveying and design problems using a computer and software.  (CCC 3, 6; PGC: CET 1, 3; SET 1)
  8. Calculate tangent and offset elevations on vertical curves.  (CCC 2, 3, 6; PGC: CET 1; SET 1)
  9. Lay out a compound or reverse curve. (CCC 3, 6; PGC: CET 1, 2; SET 1, 5)
  10. Demonstrate vertical and compound curve design. (CCC 3, 6; PGC: CET 1; SET 1)
  11. Solve fundamental problems dealing with highway drainage.  (CCC: 2, 3, 5, 6; PGC: CET 1; SET 1)
  12. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct, as expected in industry.  (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC: CET 1, 4, 5; SET 1, 6)

 

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Solve fundamental problems dealing with superelevation, friction, sight distance, stopping distance, and response-initiation time.
    1. Define sight distance and braking distance, skid resistance, curvature, superelevation, and side friction.
    2. Interpret and use various charts associated with fundamental highway design problems.
    3. Use various fundamental highway design formulas in solving a series of design problems.
  2. Compute volumes of earthwork related to route design and construction.
    1. List two formulas for cross section area calculations, determine when each should be used, and define the variables in each.
    2. List two formulas for highway earth volume calculations, determine when each should be used, and define the variables in each.
    3. Solve various problems using the one point area, three point area, average-end area, and prismoidal volume formulas.
    4. Interpret profile and slope staking notes in computing area and volume of earth work.
    5. Calculate the volume of excavation using the borrow pit method.
  3. Interpret field data associated with preliminary route location and slope staking.
    1. Define cut, fill, grade rod, ground rod, side slope, cross section, and profile.
    2. Use the drafting techniques and scales associated with profiles and cross sections.
    3. Select an appropriate scale, and using cross section paper, draw the cut-and-fill and profile from slope staking and profile notes.
  4. Perform a preliminary route survey and slope staking calculation.
    1. Set up a field book to record data associated with a preliminary route survey problem and a slope staking problem.
    2. Establish a base line and lay out full and half stations.
    3. Use an automatic or laser level and Philadelphia rod or lenker rod to obtain data for a preliminary route survey and slope staking problem.
  5. Compute the principal lengths of parts of a circular curve along with the field book data for laying out the curve.
    1. List and define the principal parts of a simple curve.
    2. List the formulas associated with the design of a simple curve, and define the variables of each.
    3. Draw and label the parts of a circular curve.
    4. Describe the factors affecting the length and sharpness of circular curves.
    5. Solve sample problems dealing with simple curves.
  6. Lay out a circular curve in the field.
    1. List the field procedures required in laying out a circular curve in the field.
    2.  Solve for a circular curve and set up and complete the field book data.
    3. Layout a circular curve in the field.
  7. Solve route surveying and design problems using a computer and software.
    1. Use computer-aided design (CAD) software to reduce survey field data in route designs.
    2. Use CAD software to calculate cut-and-fills for earthwork design problems.
    3. Integrate the use data recorders and the procedures used to download to a computer data file.
    4. Access specific software programs, and enter required data.
    5. Draft a plan and profile.
  8. Calculate tangent and offset elevations on vertical curves.
    1. Correctly define vertical curve, sag, and crest.
    2. List the major parts of a vertical curve.
    3. List the major design considerations associated with vertical curves.
    4. List methods and explain the difference between each in solving for vertical curve offset elevations.
    5. Draw examples of both sag and crest curves.
    6. Review and compute sample calculations in class.
    7. Compute tangent offset elevations in any one of three ways when given G1, G2, point of vertical intersection (PVI), and proposed length of curve.
  9. Lay out a compound or reverse curve.
    1. List the field procedures for laying out a compound or reverse curve.
    2. Calculate the required field information when given design data, and set up a completed field book format (including deflection angles) for a compound or reverse curve.
  10. Demonstrate vertical and compound curve design.
    1.  Draw a vertical and compound curve.
    2.  List the design characteristics of a vertical and compound curve.
  11. Solve fundamental problems dealing with highway drainage.
    1. Define terms commonly associated with highway drainage.
    2.  List the factors to consider when designing a drainage system for a section of a highway.
    3. Interpret and use common charts and data tables associated with highway drainage calculations.
    4. Develop and stakeout a pipeline profile.
  12. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct as expected in industry.
    1. Identify the need for self-discipline and time management in technical industries.
    2. Communicate and function effectively as a member of a team.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Grade Break-out

Formative: Assignments (weighted equally)

20%

Summative: Labs (5)

20%

Summative: Tests (4)

60%

Final Course Grade

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

CETAASCET

  1. Apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and applicable tools of the discipline to engineering activities, including but not limited to site development, hydraulics and hydrology, grading, and structural systems.
  2. Conduct standardized field and laboratory testing on civil engineering project materials.
  3. Select appropriate materials and estimate material quantities for technical projects.
  4. Use graphic techniques and productivity software to produce engineering documents.
  5. Demonstrate a commitment to quality, timeliness, professional development, and continuous improvement.

CETAASSET

  1. Apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and applicable tools of the discipline to engineering and surveying activities, including but not limited to site development, hydraulics and hydrology, grading, and structural systems.
  2. Conduct standardized field and laboratory testing on civil engineering project materials.
  3. Select appropriate materials and estimate material quantities for technical projects.
  4. Use graphic techniques and productivity software to produce engineering documents.
  5. Integrate appropriate surveying methods for land measurement and/or construction layout and the acquisition of spatial data in accordance with the laws and regulations pertaining to Professional Land Surveying.
  6. Demonstrate a commitment to quality, timeliness, professional development, and continuous improvement.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.