CUL 280 American Regional Cuisine


Campus Location:
Dover, Stanton
Effective Date:
2020-51
Prerequisite:
CUL 171
Co-Requisites:

none

Course Credits and Hours:
4.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
4.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course introduces various American regional cuisines and their ingredients, preparation methods, and cultural influences. Students prepare menus that focus on the taste, flavors, and styles of America’s diverse cuisines. Advanced cooking techniques are applied and emphasis on critical thinking skills are demonstrated as students evaluate their completed dishes. In addition, this course reinforces proper kitchen procedures, care and use of equipment, sanitation, and safe and efficient work methods.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

none

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Produce a variety of food products by applying appropriate cooking techniques using indigenous ingredients. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
  2. Demonstrate elements of kitchen rotation, preparation, service skills development, and recipe and menu development, and describe their importance. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)
  3. Operate equipment safely and correctly, and apply knowledge of laws and regulations relating to safety and sanitation in the kitchen. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4; PGC 1, 2)
  4. Discuss the historical, geographical, and cultural conditions that impact various American cuisines. (CCC 1, 5; PGC 3, 10)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Produce a variety of food products by applying appropriate cooking techniques using indigenous ingredients.
    1. Prepare a variety of foods using the sauté techniques.
    2. Fry a variety of foods to their proper doneness using pan-frying and deep-frying techniques.
    3. Roast meats, poultry, and fish to the correct doneness to develop the best flavor and texture in the finished dish.
    4. Apply proper barbecue, smoking, and modern cooking techniques to a variety of products.
    5. Apply proper grilling and broiling techniques to a variety of products.
    6. Braise and stew foods to the proper doneness.
    7. Boil, steam, poach, and shallow-poach a variety of products.
    8. Identify various foods suitable for combination cooking techniques.
    9. Prepare foods by a combination of cooking methods.
    10. Determine doneness in foods cooked by a variety of methods.
    11. Identify and use herbs, spices, oils and vinegar, condiments, marinades, and rubs.
    12. Perform basic fabrication tasks with meat, poultry, seafood, and variety meats.
    13. Prepare a variety of non-grand/classical sauces.
    14. Evaluate the quality of a properly made sauce.
    15. Prepare a variety of fruits, vegetables, starches, legumes, and grains using the basic cooking methods.
  2. Demonstrate elements of kitchen rotation, preparation, service skills development, and recipe and menu development, and describe their importance.
    1. Practice skills appropriate to the various workstations in a kitchen.
    2. Participate in different types of kitchen production for various menus to be served within realistic time constraints.
    3. Prepare foods at different stations, and coordinate on-time service to customers in the culinary arts dining room.
    4. Portion food in accordance with industry standards.
    5. Use a standardized recipe and convert to produce different yields.
    6. Develop and prepare nutritionally sound menus for service.
  3. Operate equipment safely and correctly, and apply knowledge of laws and regulations relating to safety and sanitation in the kitchen.
    1. Demonstrate knife skills and hand tool and equipment operation, emphasizing proper safety techniques.
    2. Identify and use utensils, pots, and pans, and demonstrate safe practices using stoves, mixers, ovens, and a variety of cooking equipment.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of proper food safety procedures in preparing, cooking, reheating, cooling, and storage of food.
  4. Discuss the historical, geographical, and cultural conditions that impact various American cuisines.
    1. Explain how a region’s topography and climate can influence its cuisine.
    2. Identify various foods indigenous to specific regions.
    3. Describe how to substitute local ingredients for unavailable regional ingredients.
    4. Describe the historical influences of native and foreign cultures to the development of American regional cooking.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

Quizzes (6-12) (equally weighted) (formative)

10%

Exams (1-2) (equally weighted) (summative)

10%

Daily Lab Performance (formative)

30%

Practical Cooking Assessments (2-4) (equally weighted) (summative)

20%

Assignments (4-6) (equally weighted) (summative)

20%

Sous Chef Assessment (summative)

10%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Perform standard culinary procedures using the appropriate knives, tools, and equipment.
  2. Explain and apply the basic principles of food sanitation and safety in the work environment.
  3. Use principles of food preparation to produce a variety of hot and cold food products within realistic time constraints.
  4. Apply the fundamentals of baking science to the preparation of a variety of products.
  5. Apply the principles of nutrient needs to menu planning and food preparation.
  6. Evaluate styles of leadership, and develop skills in human relations and personnel management.
  7. Apply the principles of facility design, menu planning and cost controls for ethical and sustainable purchasing, receiving, and storage of food and non-food items.
  8. Perform dining room service functions, and apply quality customer service.

  9. Categorize alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, and explain laws and procedures related to responsible alcohol service.

  10. Explain the changing historical, geographical, and cultural relationship of different foods and recipes.

 

Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.