EDC 260 Educational Psychology


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Dover, Wilmington
Effective Date:
2018-51
Prerequisite:
PSY 121 or PSY 126
Co-Requisites:

none

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
1.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course focuses on the developmental concerns of adolescents and how these issues may influence the adolescent learner in formal and informal learning situations. Academic motivation, interpersonal relationships, and teacher expectations are studied. Ten hours of observation in a designated secondary school setting are required.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Online Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Summarize the developmental issues of adolescents and their effects on learning. (CCC 1, 2, 5; PGC: MSE 3; SPC 4)
  2. Compare current educational psychology research and its implication for learning and teaching. (CCC 1, 2, 5; PGC: MSE 3; SPC 4)
  3. Analyze major theories of motivation and strategies that foster student learning. (CCC 1, 2, 5; PGC: MSE 3; SPC 4)
  4. Formulate strategies to create and sustain positive learning environments. (CCC 2, 3, 4, 5; PGC: MSE 3; SPC 4)
  5. Apply instructional strategies that promote critical thinking, understanding, and application of content knowledge. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4; PGC: MSE 3, 4; SPC 4)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Summarize the developmental issues of adolescents and their effects on learning.
    1. Explain how adolescent identity, self-esteem, and autonomy are influenced by family, peers, and school influences.
    2. Summarize the impact of psychosocial differences, such as sexual orientation, ethnicity, gender, and socio-economics on adolescents.
    3. Explain the psychological and social consequences that biological transitions have on adolescents.
  2. Compare current educational psychology research and its implication for learning and teaching.
    1. Describe evidence-based practices for teaching and learning.
    2. Summarize the importance of educational psychology research in teaching and learning.
  3. Analyze major theories of motivation and strategies that foster student learning.
    1. Illustrate how ethnic, gender, socioeconomic differences, and exceptional needs might influence student motivation.
    2. Compare and contrast extrinsic and intrinsic student motivation.
    3. Select strategies for stimulating student motivation.
    4. Demonstrate student motivation strategies that are situational and/or content specific.
  4. Formulate strategies to create and sustain positive learning environment.
    1. Explain how concepts such as general management principles, positive expectations, modeling, and pacing are important to a classroom behavior management plan.
    2. Evaluate teacher expectations and their impact on classroom management.
    3. Explain how appropriate classroom management can motivate students as well as prevent classroom problems.
    4. Assess plans and/or strategies for dealing with both minor and major disruptive classroom behaviors.
    5. Compare and contrast different conflict resolution strategies.
  5. Apply instructional strategies that promote critical thinking, understanding, and application of content knowledge.
    1. Differentiate between heterogeneous and homogeneous grouping and their affective and social effects.
    2. Demonstrate differentiated instruction.
    3. Explain three major components of active teaching.
    4. Apply the social constructivist model of teaching ad learning.
    5. Give subject-specific examples to help students construct usable knowledge.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

Exams - Summative

20%

Summative Assessments

-Journal Article Review (20%)

-Reflection on Theory and Practice (20%)

40%

Summative Observation Assignment

25%

Formative Assessments

15%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

EDCAATMSE

  1. Employ mathematical strategies to solve algebraic, geometric, trigonometric and calculus problems.
  2. Prove or disprove mathematical statements using formal arguments.
  3. Apply knowledge of the physical, social, emotional and cognitive development of adolescents.
  4. Access and implement educational technology.

EDCAATSPC

  1. Employ mathematical problem solving strategies to solve algebra, trigonometry, analytical geometry and calculus problems.
  2. Apply scientific principles to explain everyday phenomena.
  3. Analyze problems, safely and ethically conduct scientific research, and interpret and report the results.
  4. Integrate psychological and human development concepts in the educational process.
  5. Demonstrate and explain the scientific process and related modern laboratory procedures.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.