ELC 127 Digital Electronics


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Dover, Stanton
Effective Date:
2020-51
Prerequisite:
ENG 090 or concurrent or ENG 091 or concurrent or EAP 093 or concurrent or higher, MAT 020 or concurrent or higher, SSC 100 or concurrent
Co-Requisites:

none

Course Credits and Hours:
4.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
3.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course covers digital concepts, including logic levels, pulse waveforms, number systems, logic gates, Boolean algebra, DeMorgan's theorem, systematic reduction of logical expressions, universal property of negative-AND (NAND) and NOR gates, pulsed operations, adders, comparators, encoder/decoders, multiplexers/demultiplexers, parity circuits, flip-flops, and synchronous and asynchronous counters.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

Digital Parts Kit, Digital Probe, TI-84+ or TI-89 Calculator.

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Interpret basic digital concepts, number systems, and codes. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC EEN 1, 2; ETT 1, 2)
  2. Describe and analyze digital logic levels, pulse waveforms, data transmission methods, and digital integrated circuits. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC EEN 1, 2; ETT 1, 2)
  3. Explain the principles of basic logic gates as used in digital circuitry. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC EEN 1, 2, 3, 4; ETT 1, 2, 3, 4)
  4. Apply Boolean algebra concepts and techniques to simplify combinational logic circuits. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC EEN 1, 2, 3, 4; ETT 1, 2, 3, 4)
  5. Apply the principles of binary arithmetic operations to solve digital mathematical problems. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC EEN 1, 2; ETT 1, 2)
  6. Describe the operating characteristics of binary adders, comparators, encoders, decoders, multiplexers, demultiplexers, parity generators, and detectors as used in digital electronic based circuits, sub-systems, and systems. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC EEN 1, 2, 3, 4; ETT 1, 2, 3, 4)
  7. Explain the uses and operating characteristics of digital latches and flip-flops. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC EEN 1, 2, 3, 4; ETT 1, 2, 3, 4)
  8. Explain the uses and operating characteristics of monostable and astable multivibrators and digital counters. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC EEN 1, 2, 3, 4; ETT 1, 2, 3, 4)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Interpret basic digital concepts, number systems, and codes.
    1. Differentiate between analog and digital signals.
    2. Discuss how voltage levels are used to represent digital quantities.
    3. Convert decimal form to and from binary form.
    4. Convert decimal form to and from hexadecimal form.
    5. Convert decimal numbers to binary coded decimal (BCD) form.
    6. Convert between the binary and octal number systems.
    7. Convert between the binary and hexadecimal number systems.
  2. Describe and analyze digital logic levels, pulse waveforms, data transmission methods, and digital integrated circuits.
    1. Explain and test various parameters of a pulse waveform such as leading edge, trailing edge, rise time, fall time, pulse width, frequency, period, and duty cycle.
    2. Describe how digital data is transmitted using either serial or parallel communication, and explain their differences.
    3. Identify pin numbers on integrated circuit packages.
    4. Interpret and use logic gate datasheets.
    5. Identify the differences between common types of logic families.
    6. Define propagation delay time, power dissipation, input and output current, and fan-out in relation to logic gates.
    7. Recognize digital instruments, and understand how they are used in troubleshooting digital circuits and systems.
  3. Explain the principles of basic logic gates as used in digital circuitry.
    1. Describe the operation and list truth tables for AND, OR, NAND, NOR, NOT, EX OR, and EX NOR logic gates.
    2. Identify digital devices that are used to implement the logical functions above.
    3. Construct timing diagrams showing the proper time relationships of inputs and outputs for the various logic gates.
    4. Construct logic circuitry using the universal capability of NAND and NOR gates using acceptable industry standards and proper tools and equipment.
  4. Apply Boolean algebra concepts and techniques to simplify combinational logic circuits.
    1. Express the operation of AND, OR, NAND, NOR, NOT, EX OR, and EX NOR gates with Boolean algebra expressions.
    2. Apply the basic laws and rules of Boolean algebra to simplify expressions.
    3. Apply DeMorgan’s theorems to Boolean expressions.
    4. Convert Boolean expressions of any form into sum-of-products form.
    5. Use AND-OR and AND-OR-INVERT circuits to implement sum-of-products (SOP) and product-of-sums (POS) expressions.
    6. Use a Karnaugh map to simplify Boolean expressions and truth table functions.
  5. Apply the principles of binary arithmetic operations to solve digital mathematical problems.
    1. Solve binary number problems using addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division techniques.
    2. Compute the 1’s and 2’s complements of a binary number.
    3. Express signed numbers in binary form.
    4. Solve arithmetic operations with signed binary numbers.
  6. Describe the operating characteristics of binary adders, comparators, encoders, decoders, multiplexers, demultiplexers, parity generators, and detectors as used in digital electronic based circuits, sub-systems, and systems.
    1. Explain the difference between half adders and full adders.
    2. Use full adders to implement multibit parallel binary adders.
    3. Use the magnitude comparator to determine the relationship between two binary numbers and cascaded comparators to handle the comparison of larger numbers.
    4. Construct and test a basic binary decoder using acceptable industry standards and the tools and equipment required in your work environment.
    5. Construct and test a basic binary encoder using acceptable industry standards and the tools and equipment required in your work environment.
    6. Construct and test basic binary multiplexers using acceptable industry standards and the tools and equipment required in your work environment.
    7. Construct and test basic binary demultiplexers using acceptable industry standards and the tools and equipment required in your work environment.
  7. Explain the uses and operating characteristics of digital latches and flip-flops.
    1. Explain the differences between an S-R latch and a D latch.
    2. Recognize the differences between a latch and a flip-flop.
    3. Explain how S-R, D, and J-K flip-flops differ.
    4. Explain how master-slave flip-flops differ from the edge-triggered devices.
    5. Sketch timing diagrams showing the proper time relationships of inputs and outputs for the various flip-flop devices.
    6. Explain the significance of propagation delays, set-up time, hold time, maximum operating frequency, minimum clock pulse widths, and power dissipation in the application of flip-flops.
    7. Apply and troubleshoot flip-flops in basic applications using acceptable industry standards and the tools and equipment required in your work environment.
  8. Explain the uses and operating characteristics of monostable and astable multivibrators and digital counters.
    1. Describe the difference between an asynchronous and a synchronous counter.
    2. Analyze counter-timing diagrams, and create a timing diagram.
    3. Design a simple controlled synchronous digital counter (or equivalent) circuit employing sequential design techniques.
    4. Predict and modify the modulus of a counter.
    5. Describe and predict the sequences of various configured counters, such as four-bit types, decade, up/down, and divide by N counters.
    6. Use integrated circuit (IC) counters in various applications.
    7. Use cascading to achieve higher modulus counts sequences.
    8. Explain how retriggerable and nonretriggerable one-shots differ.
    9. Use a timer to operate as either an astable or monostable multivibrator.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

Summative: 4 Exams (Equally weighted)

50%

Summative: (10-15) Laboratory Experiments (Equally weighted)

30%

Formative: Homework/Pop Quizzes (Equally weighted)

10%

Formative: Quizzes (Equally weighted)

10%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Perform the duties of an entry-level technician using the skills, modern tools, theory, and techniques of the electronics engineering technology.
  2. Apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to electronics engineering technology problems that require limited application of principles but extensive practical knowledge.
  3. Conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments using analysis tools and troubleshooting methods.
  4. Identify, analyze, and solve narrowly defined electronics engineering technology problems.
  5. Explain the importance of engaging in self-directed continuing professional development.
  6. Demonstrate basic management, organizational, and leadership skills which commit to quality, timeliness and continuous improvement.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.