ELC 272 Electronic Circuit Analysis I


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Dover, Stanton
Effective Date:
2018-51
Prerequisite:
ELC 266
Co-Requisites:

none

Course Credits and Hours:
4.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
4.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course introduces the physical principles of solid state electronic devices. Topics include a quantitative study of elementary circuits including biasing, linear power amplifiers, low-frequency small signal analysis, multiple transistor circuits, and feedback.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

Digilent’s Analog Discovery, Electronics Parts Kit, TI-84+ or TI-89 Calculator.

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Compare and contrast analog and digital signals, including frequency characteristics. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC 2, 4)
  2. Describe amplifier circuit models. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC 2, 4)
  3. Explain the configuration and types of operational amplifiers (op amps). (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4)
  4. Describe the types and construction of semiconductors. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC 2, 4)
  5. Describe the characteristics and applications of diodes. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4)
  6. Explain the structure and configurations of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4)
  7. Explain the structure, characteristics, and biasing concepts of bipolar junction transistors (BJTs). (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Compare and contrast analog and digital signals, including frequency characteristics.
    1. Identify the parameters of signals.
    2. Calculate amplitude, frequency, period and phase angles for sinewave signals.
    3. Recognize the differences between analog and digital signals.
    4. Explain the purpose of a digital to analog converter (DAC) and an analog to digital converter (ADC).
    5. Calculate the digital value of an analog signal.
    6. Calculate the analog value of a digital signal.
    7. Identify the amplifier symbol.
    8. Explain amplifier signal amplification.
    9. Calculate voltage, current, and power gain.
    10. Express gain in decibels.
    11. Explain the use of amplifier power supplies and the distortion from amplifier saturation.
  2. Describe amplifier circuit models.
    1. Identify the circuit models of amplifiers.
    2. Discuss the four amplifier models.
    3. Calculate the gain of cascaded amplifiers.
    4. Describe how to measure an amplifier’s frequency response.
    5. Calculate the 3 decibels (dB) bandwidth of an amplifier.
    6. Recognize the characteristics of a single-time-constant network.
    7. Identify and construct a bode plot.
    8. Determine an amplifier frequency response classification from the magnitude response curve.
  3. Explain the configuration and types of operational amplifiers (op amps).
    1. Describe the characteristics of an ideal operational amplifier.
    2. Identify the circuit symbol for a basic op amp.
    3. Describe, analyze, and test the output signals for op amp negative feedback, inverting, and non-inverting linear operational amplifiers configurations.
    4. Describe, analyze, and test the output signals for summing, differential, integrating, and differentiating linear operational amplifier circuits.
    5. Design inverting, non-inverting, voltage follower, summing, and difference operational amplifier circuits.
    6. Describe the non-ideal characteristics of an op amp.
    7. Describe, analyze, test, and explain the significance of an operational amplifier’s common-mode rejection ratio, slew rate, offset voltage, input bias, and offset currents.
    8. Explain the role of negative feedback, and discuss the trade-off between circuit gain and dynamic range.
    9. Recognize the effects the op amp configurations have on the input and output resistances.
  4. Describe the types and construction of semiconductors.
    1. Explain the differences among insulators, conductors, and semiconductors.
    2. Describe how current propagates through a semiconductor.
    3. Describe doping and the properties of n-type and p-type semiconductors.
    4. Describe the barrier potential of both p-type and n-type junctions, and discuss its significance.
    5. Explain the capacitive effects on the p-n junction.
  5. Describe the characteristics and applications of diodes.
    1. Describe the electrical characteristics of a diode and the diode I-V curve.
    2. Describe the characteristics of a forward and reverse biased diode in terms of electrical approximations.
    3. Identify diode terminals on its schematic symbol.
    4. Interpret and use diode datasheets.
    5. Recognize the terminal characteristics of junction diodes.
    6. Test a diode using a digital multimeter (DMM).
    7. Model the diode forward characteristics using the exponential model.
    8. Graphically determine the operating point from the exponential model of the diode.
    9. Recognize and analyze the small signal model of a diode.
    10. Identify a Zener diode schematic symbol, define its function, and describe the Zener diode operating characteristics.
    11. Calculate the expected output of a Zener diode regulator, and determine the limits of Zener operation for the given circuit elements.
    12. Analyze and determine the output voltage waveforms for half-wave, full-wave, and bridge rectifier circuits.
    13. Analyze and determine the output voltage waveform for a biased and non-biased diode limiter circuit.
    14. Analyze and determine the output voltage waveform for a diode clamper circuit.
    15. Assemble and test output waveforms using an oscilloscope of limiting and clamping circuits.
    16. Identify a varactor diode schematic symbol, define its function, and describe the varactor diode operating characteristics.
    17. Identify a light-emitting diode schematic symbol, define its function, and describe the light-emitting diode operating characteristics.
    18. Identify a photodiode schematic symbol, define its function, and describe the photodiode operating characteristics.
  6. Explain the structure and configurations of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs).
    1. Describe the basic structure and operation of MOSFETs.
    2. Identify the voltages and currents that flow in a MOSFET.
    3. Explain pinch-off voltage and current saturation.
    4. Identify p-channel and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) MOSFETs.
    5. Identify the terminals on a MOSFET schematic symbol.
    6. Interpret the V-I characteristic curves for an n-channel MOSFET.
    7. Identify the characteristics of a p-channel MOSFET.
    8. Calculate direct current (DC) parameters of various MOSFET circuits.
    9. Discuss MOSFET transistor body, breakdown, and temperature effects.
  7. Explain the structure, characteristics, and biasing concepts of bipolar junction transistors (BJTs).
    1. Describe the basic structure and operation of bipolar junction transistors.
    2. Identify the terminals on a bipolar junction transistor schematic symbol and for various packages.
    3. Interpret and use bipolar junction transistor datasheets.
    4. Identify the voltages and currents which flow in a bipolar junction transistor.
    5. Test a bipolar junction transistor using a digital multimeter (DMM).
    6. Calculate DC parameters of a BJT circuit.
    7. Define DC beta and DC alpha, and explain their significance.
    8. Sketch the DC load line for a bipolar junction transistor circuit.
    9. Define saturation and cutoff, and explain their significance.
    10. Describe how a bipolar junction transistor can be used as an amplifier or a switch.
    11. Discuss transistor breakdown and temperature effects.
    12. Explain the basics of amplifier operation.
    13. Identify the voltage-transfer characteristics of an amplifier.
    14. Calculate small signal voltage gain.
    15. Recognize amplifier small-signal models.
    16. Identify BJT amplifier configurations.
    17. Identify MOSFET amplifier configurations.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

 
Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Integrate modern tools of the engineering discipline into the field of study.
  2. Apply mathematics, science, engineering, and technology theory to solve electrical and computer engineering and electronics engineering technology problems.   
  3. Conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments using analysis tools and troubleshooting methods.
  4. Identify, analyze, and solve electrical and computer engineering and electronics engineering technology problems. 
  5. Explain the importance of engaging in self-directed continuing professional development.
  6. Demonstrate basic management, organizational, and leadership skills that commit to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.