ELM 155 Manufacturing Topics


Campus Location:
Dover
Effective Date:
2018-51
Prerequisite:
MAT 180
Co-Requisites:

none

Course Credits and Hours:
4.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
2.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course introduces product development and production manufacturing. Topics include design requirements and manufacturing processes used in industry such as casting, molding, forming, cutting, and welding. Course topics also includes quality assurance, economical manufacturing methods, selection of materials and machinery, estimation of materials and labor costs, production planning and scheduling, and the layout of a production line.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

Calculator and flash drive/data storage

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

This workforce solution was funded by a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration. The solution was created by the grantee and does not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Labor. The Department of Labor makes no guarantees, warranties, or assurances of any kind, express or implied, with respect to such information, including any information on linked sites, and including, but not limited to accuracy of the information or its completeness, timeliness, usefulness, adequacy, continued availability or ownership.

Unless otherwise specified, this work by Delaware Technical Community College is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.   Creative Commons Attribution Logo

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Discuss the basic components, governing principles, utilization, and advantages/disadvantages of production lines. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 4, 5, 6)
  2. Discuss the basic components, governing principles, utilization, and advantages/disadvantages of programmable automation. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 4, 5, 6)
  3. Describe the main components of the manufacturing engineering function within a manufacturing organization. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6)
  4. Discuss the development of and need for logistics and operations management functions, skills, and techniques. (CCC 1, 2, 4; PGC 4, 5, 6)
  5. Discuss introductory logistics management concepts in supply chain management, inventory management, materials requirements planning, just-in-time (JIT), lean manufacturing, and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. (CCC 1, 2, 4; PGC 4, 6)
  6. Evaluate operations design elements such as workflow, quality, capacity, layout, human factors, job design, and product development. (CCC 1, 2, 4; PGC 6)
  7. Develop a design and manufacturing process for a hypothetical mechanical product as a member of a development team. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
  8. Discuss the development of and need for total quality management (TQM), Six Sigma methodology, statistical process control in logistics and operations management. (CCC 1, 2, 4: PGC 6)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Discuss the basic components, governing principles, utilization, and advantages/disadvantages of production lines.
    1. Identify the main components of a manual production line.
    2. Identify the main components of an automated production line.
    3. Determine the minimum number of workstations required for a production line for a specific product.
    4. Calculate line balance for a production line.
    5. Analyze the theoretical efficiency of a production line.
  2. Discuss the basic components, governing principles, utilization, and advantages/disadvantages of programmable automation.
    1. Describe the main components of a numerical control (NC) system.
    2. Explain the differences, similarities, advantages, and disadvantages between open-loop and closed-loop NC systems.
    3. Identify the components of an industrial robotic system.
    4. Describe the control systems used for industrial robotic systems.
  3. Describe the main components of the manufacturing engineering function within a manufacturing organization.
    1. Describe how process planning is used in the manufacturing environment.
    2. Prepare a route sheet for a hypothetical component part.
    3. Explain how designing for manufacturability can reduce product cost and reduce the time it takes to bring a new product to market.
    4. Outline the general principles and guidelines in designing for manufacturability.
    5. Outline the process of concurrent engineering and how it is applied to new product development.
    6. Describe the main types of rapid prototyping and how they are used in product development.
    7. Describe the key considerations in incorporating ergonomics in the design of manufacturing and assembly workstations.
    8. Discuss the major factors influencing the quality of manufactured goods and how they can be monitored, controlled, and continuously improved to increase quality.
  4. Discuss the development of and need for logistics and operations management functions, skills, and techniques
    1. Discuss logistics and operations management.
    2. Describe the role of operations managers in an organization.
    3. Discuss the different ways to achieve competitive advantage.
    4. Explain the ten critical decisions of operations management.
    5. Discuss quality, and describe international quality standards.
    6. Explain the importance of total quality management (TQM).
  5. Discuss introductory logistics management concepts in supply chain management, inventory management, materials requirements planning, just-in-time (JIT), lean manufacturing, and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems.
    1. Define supply chain management, and describe the importance of supplier development in procurement activities.
    2. List available transportation modes and basic warehousing and distribution activities, and explain the advantages and disadvantages of each.
    3. Describe the inventory concepts of economic order quantities (EOQ) and safety stock.
    4. Explain JIT, lean manufacturing, and the Toyota Production System (TPS).
    5. Discuss the role of ERP systems in integrating information both within a company and throughout its supply chain.
  6. Evaluate operations design elements such as workflow, quality, capacity, layout, human factors, job design, and product development
    1. Create a simple flowchart of a manufacturing, logistics, or service process.
    2. Create a cause and effect fishbone diagram for a quality issue.
    3. Differentiate among warehouse, fixed-position, process-oriented, and product- oriented layouts.
    4. Describe the job design continuum, self-directed work teams, methods analysis, and the visual workplace.
    5. Discuss the role of operations managers in product and service design.
  7. Develop a design and manufacturing process for a hypothetical mechanical product as a member of a development team.
    1. Conduct a market review for a hypothetical mechanical product.
    2. Develop a design for a mechanical product.
    3. Prepare engineering, working, and assembly drawings.
    4. Summarize materials of construction, production methods, and assembly techniques.
    5. Develop a detailed bill of materials (BOM) and a yield analysis.
    6. Generate route sheets for components and component assembly.
    7. Prepare an economy-of-scale analysis for one or more components.
    8. Design a production line, including work stations, machinery, tooling, and staffing.
    9. Prepare a cost estimate.
  8. Discuss the development of and need for total quality management (TQM), Six Sigma methodology, statistical process control in logistics and operations management.
    1. Define quality from the viewpoint of the customer and the other major stakeholders in an organization.
    2. Discuss variation and its effect on product and service quality.
    3. Explain the evolution of quality from inspection to TQM.
    4. Define the concepts of continual improvement and TQM.
    5. Discuss the quality theories of various leaders in the field and the emergence of statistical process control as a continual improvement tool.
    6. Explain the application of Six Sigma methodology for continual improvement of products and processes.
    7. Describe the key considerations in incorporating ergonomics in the design of manufacturing and assembly workstations.
    8. Discuss the major factors influencing the quality of manufactured goods and how they can be monitored, controlled, and continuously improved to increase quality.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

 
Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Under engineers' direction, design basic circuitry and draft sketches to clarify details of design documentation.
  2. Build, modify, and test circuitry or electronic components according to engineering instructions, technical manuals, and knowledge of electrical or electronic systems.
  3. Install, maintain, adjust, and calibrate electrical or electronic equipment.
  4. Identify and resolve equipment malfunctions.
  5. Read blueprints, wiring diagrams, schematic drawings, and engineering instructions for assembling, maintaining, or repairing equipment.
  6. Employ ethical standards, sound leadership and management principles, and participate in lifelong learning.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.