ENV 240 Environmental Field Sampling


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Stanton
Effective Date:
2018-52
Prerequisite:
BIO 150, CHM 110
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
2.00 lecture hours/week
4.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course examines theory, application, methodology, and instrumentation used in the sampling and analysis of environmental contaminants. Topics include water sampling, air quality sampling, soil sampling, National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting, solid waste management, water treatment, and municipal/industrial wastewater treatment.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Explain the principles of environmental sampling and monitoring. (CCC 1, 5, 6; PGC EET 1, 5, 6)
  2. Conduct environmental monitoring using field and/or laboratory equipment and the methodology as determined in the sampling plan. (CCC 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC EET 1, 2, 3, 6).
  3. Apply quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures in field sampling of air, water, or soil. (CCC 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC EET 1, 2, 3, 6)
  4. Employ laboratory and/or field safety procedures and precautions. (CCC 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC EET 1, 2, 6)
  5. Develop a sampling plan for air, water, or soil. (CCC 1, 2, 5 ,6; PGC EET 1, 3, 4, 6)
  6. Analyze results of environmental data. (CCC 2, 4, 5, 6; PGC EET 1, 2, 3, 4, 6)
  7. Formulate a study discussion and conclusion using environmental data. (CCC 2, 4, 5, 6; PGC EET 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
  8. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct as expected in industry. (CCC 1, 3, 4; PGC EET 1, 3, 6)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Explain the principles of environmental sampling and monitoring.
    1. Explain why environmental sampling and monitoring are needed.
    2. Describe the laws, rules, and regulations that require and govern sampling and monitoring.
    3. Explain factors affecting decision making with regards to sampling and monitoring.
    4. Differentiate among sampling plans, monitoring plans, and management plans.
  2. Conduct environmental monitoring using field and/or laboratory equipment and the methodology as determined in the sampling plan.
    1. Demonstrate proper instrumentation procedures for laboratory and field sample collection and/or analysis.
    2. Demonstrate proper calibration and cleaning of equipment according to manufacturer’s specifications.
    3. Prepare sample containers using decontamination measures as necessary.
    4. Collect environmental samples (field and/or laboratory) for air, water, or soil according to QA/QC procedures.
  3. Apply quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures in environmental sampling of air, water, or soil.
    1. Compare and contrast QA/QC standards and quality assurance protection plans.
    2. Explain the legal significance of the chain of custody form.
    3. Complete a chain of custody form.
    4. Apply QA/QC standards while taking samples, which includes acquiring samples in the field, legal tracking/documentation of samples, properly transporting samples, abiding by standard sample hold times, preparing the samples for laboratory analysis (where applicable), and analyzing the samples (where applicable).
  4. Employ laboratory and/or field safety procedures and precautions.
    1. Compare and contrast the material safety data sheet (MSDS) to the safety data sheet (SDS).
    2. Use protective laboratory safety measures and equipment as necessary.
    3. Use field safety measures as necessary.
  5. Develop a sampling plan for air, water, or soil.
    1. Describe types of samples (e.g., single, composite, or grab).
    2. Compare and contrast the types of sampling plans.
    3. Select the appropriate type of sample and sampling equipment for a given environmental disturbance or condition.
    4. Create a sampling plan for air, water, or soil using the scientific method.
  6. Analyze results of environmental data.
    1. Analyze monitoring data collected.
    2. Graph and/or diagram the data.
    3. Choose the appropriate graphics that best represents the data.
  7. Formulate a study discussion and conclusion using environmental data.
    1. Identify significant results.
    2. Explain potential reasons for the results.
    3. Interpret study results against federal, state, and local regulations.
    4. Draw conclusions about the results.
    5. Select management options (if applicable).
    6. Evaluate the original sampling plan methodology and associated results.
  8. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct as expected in industry.
    1. Identify the importance for self-discipline and time management in technical industries.
    2. Communicate and function effectively as a member of a team.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Grade Break-out

Summative: Lab/Field Exercises

50%

Summative: Final Project 

20%

Formative: Assignments (Quizzes, Readings, Journals, Participation, Lab Safety/Cleanup, etc.) (equally weighted)

30%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and applicable tools of the discipline to engineering activities, including but not limited to site development, hydraulics and hydrology, grading, water and wastewater treatment, pollution prevention and treatment, and sustainable design.
  2. Conduct standardized field and laboratory testing.
  3. Demonstrate a commitment to quality, timeliness, professional development, and continuous improvement.
  4. Use graphic techniques and productivity software to produce technical documents.
  5. Explain the major aspects of the normal ecology of the planet and risks associated with polluting the environment.
  6. Apply current federal, state, and local environmental and safety regulations and industry best management practices.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.