FSY 220 Food Chemistry


Campus Location:
Georgetown
Effective Date:
2020-51
Prerequisite:
CHM 110
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
4.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
2.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course applies the basic scientific principles of food systems and chemical reactions for major food ingredients: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and other components found in fresh and processed food products with respect to food quality. Reactions that affect color, flavor, texture, nutrition, and safety of food are emphasized. 

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Describe the major functional groups that occur in food molecules. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC 1)
  2. Explain the significance of food enzymatic reactions. (CCC 1, 2, 5; PGC 1)
  3. Discuss the chemical and functional properties of the major food components. (CCC 1, 2, 5; PGC 1, 5)
  4. Determine major changes in color, flavor, and texture of foods during handling, processing, and storage. (CCC 1, 2, 5; PGC 1, 2, 5)
  5. Identify the importance of food acidity in terms of pH and titratable acidity. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 5)
  6. Use laboratory techniques to apply scientific principles to comprehend chemical properties in foods. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Describe the major functional groups that occur in food molecules.
    1. List the major functional groups that occur in food molecules.
    2. Identify and write the chemical structure of the functional group found in food.
  2. Explain the significance of food enzymatic reactions.
    1. Differentiate between enzymatic and non-enzymatic browning reactions.
    2. Define oxidation, reduction oxidizing agent, and reducing agent.
  3. Discuss the chemical and functional properties of the major food components.
    1. Classify carbohydrates based on their chemical structure.
    2. Describe the chemical structure and characteristics of carbohydrates.
    3. Identify important food sugars, the chemical reactions they participate in, and their functional properties.
    4. Examine the difference between classes of lipid molecules and fatty acids.
    5. Identify the structure of food proteins, and list their functional properties.
    6. Discuss the significance of water activity (aw) in foods.
    7. Explain how the quality of water can influence foods.
    8. Describe bound and free water in foods.
    9. Interpret the factors that can determine the freezing and boiling points of water.
  4. Determine major changes in color, flavor, and texture of foods during handling, processing, and storage.
    1. Describe Maillard browning, Strecker degradation, and caramelization.
    2. Identify the four basic tastes: sweet, sour, bitter, and salty.
    3. Match texturizing agents with their functionality.
    4. Classify certified food colorants, and select those that are exempt and from federal certifications.
    5. Discuss various processing methods that are used in the food industry to prevent quality changes in food.
  5. Identify the importance of food acidity in terms of pH and titratable acidity.
    1. Define pH and titratable acidity.
    2. Determine the values of the pH scale.
    3. Identify techniques to measure pH and titratable acidity.
  6. Use laboratory techniques to apply scientific principles to comprehend chemical properties in foods.
    1. Perform laboratory techniques to measure chemical properties in foods.
    2. Prepare solutions to identify food additives, colors, flavors, determine pH, and titratable acidity measurements.
    3. Calculate titrations measurements in unknown solutions.
    4. Manipulate various food products to improve the food quality characteristics.
    5. Create food emulsions, and determine emulsifying agents.
    6. Measure viscosity and consistency in various food products.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

Summative: Exams (6) (equally weighted)

75%

Formative: Lab activity/written assignments (equally weighted)

25%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Apply knowledge of the theories and principles of biology, chemistry, and food microbiology.
  2. Analyze food samples by common quantitative and qualitative techniques.
  3. Identify emerging technologies and ingredient innovations that have the potential to transform product and process development.
  4. Analyze market trends associated with the development of foods to maintain and improve health.
  5. Apply knowledge of food processing to improve the quality, efficiency, and sustainability of processing and packaging efforts.
  6. Apply knowledge of best practices, risk analysis, traceability, and analytical tools in the areas of microbial and chemical food safety and defense.
  7. Apply knowledge of public policy, food laws, and regulations that have national and international implications for the food industry, research, and consumer food safety.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.