GIS 101 Introduction to GIS


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Stanton
Effective Date:
2018-51
Prerequisite:
ENG 090 or ENG 091, MAT 020, SSC 100 or concurrent
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
2.00 lecture hours/week
2.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of a geographic information system (GIS) through hands-on applications with common GIS software. The course will focus on collecting, managing, processing, and presenting geographic data. Topics include data structures and basic functions, methods of data capture and sources of data, and the nature and characteristics of spatial data and objects.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Hybrid Course
Online Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Identify spatial data and the major components of a GIS. (CCC 1, 5; PGC GIS 1, 3, 5, EET 1, 6, CET 1, 10, 15)
  2. Demonstrate georeferencing of spatial data, and explain the geographic variables involved. (CCC 1, 5, 6; PGC GIS 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, EET 1, 2, 5, 6, 9, CET 2, 5, 12)
  3. Employ vector data structure to create geographic data. (CCC 1, 5, 6; PGC GIS 1, 3, 5, 7, EET 1, 2, 5, 6, 9, CET 1, 2, 5, 10, 15)
  4. Identify and describe raster data models. (CCC 1, 5, 6; PGC, GIS 1, 3, 5, 7, EET 1, 2, 5, 6, 9)
  5. Employ fundamentals of data management and acquisition of new data. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC GIS 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, EET 1, 3, 5, 6, 9)
  6. Illustrate GIS data input and manipulation. (CCC 1, 2, 5, 6; PGC GIS 1, 3, 5, 7, EET 1, 3, 5, 6, 9, CET 1, 2, 5, 10, 15)
  7. Employ meaningful data display in the creation of maps. (CCC 1, 5; PGC GIS 1, 2, 3, 7, EET 1, 3, 6, CET 1, 2, 10, 15)
  8. Explain data exploration and manipulation in a GIS. (CCC 1, 5; PGC GIS 1, 3, 4, 7, 8, EET 1, 6, CET 1, 5, 10, 15)
  9. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct as expected in industry. (CCC 4; PGC GIS 7, 8, EET 7, 8, 9, CET 7, 8, 9)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Identify spatial data and the major components of a GIS.
    1. Recognize and identify spatial data.
    2. Identify components of a GIS and associated software.
    3. Discuss how spatial data is used in GIS applications.
    4. Define vector data models, raster data models, and spatial data infrastructure framework.
    5. Identify common GIS operations.
  2. Demonstrate georeferencing of spatial data, and explain the geographic variables involved.
    1. Define vertical datum and horizontal datum.
    2. Identify and differentiate global and planar coordinate systems.
    3. Define map projection.
    4. Identify and discuss common map projections and their distortion properties.
    5. Distinguish between different coordinate systems and their application with GIS.
    6. Import data into a specific coordinate system.
    7. Project geographic data from a geographic to a planer coordinate system.
    8. Demonstrate converting from one coordinate system to another.
  3. Employ vector data structure to create geographic data.
    1. Describe the elements of vector data.
    2. Identify the importance of topology in GIS mapping and the rules that must be applied.
    3. Describe object-based data models and the classes of relationships.
    4. Produce and edit vector data.
    5. Digitize vector data.
  4. Identify and describe raster data models.
    1. Describe the elements of raster data.
    2. Identify and discuss the types of raster data.
    3. Describe raster data structure.
  5. Employ fundamentals of data management and acquisition of new data.
    1. Identify and describe existing data sources, including but not limited to GPS, remote sensing, aerial photography, and Master Address File/Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (MAF/TIGER) system or database.
    2. Identify where errors originate from in mapping, including accuracy and precision of data.
    3. Explain metadata.
    4. Describe control points.
    5. Import existing data from various sources and file formats.
    6. Georectify a scanned map.
  6. Illustrate GIS data input and manipulation.
    1. Identify the types of attribute data.
    2. Identify attribute data entry methods and verification.
    3. Describe how to classify and manipulate attribute data.
    4. Classify, manipulate, and create attribute data.
    5. Produce a geodatabase and feature dataset.
    6. Convert vector data to raster data.
  7. Employ meaningful data display in the creation of maps.
    1. Identify basic fundamentals of cartographic design principles, including symbology, color, classifications, and standard map design layouts.
    2. Describe the various types of maps.
    3. Employ cartographic design principles to produce a meaningful map.
  8. Employ data exploration and manipulation techniques in a GIS.
    1. Identify and employ various query types and associated properties.
    2. Distinguish between raster- and vector-based data applications.
    3. Use geoprocessing applications such as clip, buffer, and overlay.
    4. Measure distances between points and lines.
    5. Employ operations common to raster- and vector-based data analysis.
  9. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct as expected in industry.
    1. Identify the need for self-discipline and time management in technical industries.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to communicate and function effectively as a member of a team.
    3. Apply professional and ethical responsibilities under the GIS Certification Institute’s Code of Ethics and Rules of Conduct.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

 
Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

GISAASGIS:

  1. Apply knowledge, techniques, and skills of geography and geospatial technologies such as geographic information systems (GIS), Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and remote sensing (RS).
  2. Employ cartographic design principles to develop effective visual representations of geospatial data, including maps, graphs, and diagrams.
  3. Design and implement GIS systems using common geospatial software and hardware to acquire, store, manage, analyze, and visualize spatial data for a variety of disciplines.
  4. Utilize geospatial techniques and common analytical methods to solve problems.
  5. Evaluate and employ effective data management and database design techniques.
  6. Apply fundamental concepts of programming, application development, geospatial information technology, and related technologies.
  7. Integrate a commitment to address professional and ethical responsibilities, including a respect for accuracy standards and diversity.
  8. Recognize the need for and an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development.

ENVAASEET:

  1. Apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools of the discipline to narrowly defined engineering technology activities.
  2. Function effectively as a member of a technical team.
  3. Conduct standard tests and measurements, and conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments.
  4. Function effectively as a member of a technical team.
  5. Identify, analyze, and solve narrowly defined engineering technology problems.
  6. Apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and nontechnical environments; and identify and use appropriate technical literature.
  7. Recognize the need for and an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development.
  8. Integrate a commitment to address professional and ethical responsibilities, with a respect for diversity.
  9. Demonstrate a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.
  10. Explain the major aspects of the normal ecology of the planet and risks associated with polluting the environment.
  11. Apply the concepts of professional practice and the roles and responsibilities of public institutions and private organizations pertaining to environmental engineering.
  12. Apply current federal, state and local environmental and safety regulations.

CETAASCET:

  1. Apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools of the discipline to narrowly defined engineering technology activities.
  2. Apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require limited application of principles but extensive practical knowledge.
  3. Conduct standard tests and measurements, and to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments.
  4. Function effectively as a member of a technical team.
  5. Identify, analyze, and solve narrowly defined engineering technology problems.
  6. Apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and nontechnical environments; and identify and use appropriate technical literature.
  7. Recognize the need for and an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development.
  8. Integrate a commitment to address professional and ethical responsibilities, including a respect for diversity.
  9. Demonstrate a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.
  10. Utilize graphic techniques to produce engineering documents.
  11. Conduct standardized field and laboratory testing on civil engineering materials.
  12. Utilize modern surveying methods for land measurement and/or construction layout.
  13. Determine forces and stresses in elementary structural systems.
  14. Estimate material quantities for technical projects.
  15. Employ productivity software to solve technical problems.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.