HDM 101 Introduction to Homeland Security and Emergency Management


Campus Location:
Dover
Effective Date:
2019-51
Prerequisite:
ENG 090 or ENG 091, SSC 100 or concurrent
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
0.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course introduces the student to the various agencies that provide homeland security services and how they prepare for and respond to a wide variety of actual and potential emergencies. The legal and philosophical bases and enabling legislation for the existing governmental structures are also explored.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Hybrid Course
Online Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Use terminology specific to the existing and emerging disciplines of homeland security and emergency management. (CCC 1; PGC 1)
  2. Explain the historical context and current operations of the various agencies comprising homeland security and emergency management in the United States. (CCC 1, 5; PGC 4)
  3. Explain the statutory authority pertinent to current Department of Homeland Security service providers. (CCC 5; PGC 1)
  4. Interpret the characteristics of all-hazards threats to homeland security. (CCC 2; PGC 2)
  5. Explain the statutory authority pertinent to current Department of Homeland Security service providers. (CCC 2; PGC 2, 3)
  6. Interpret response and recovery strategies used by various homeland security stakeholders. (CCC 1, 2, 3; PGC 1, 2, 3)
  7. Discuss the importance of communication systems within the context of homeland security. (CCC 1, 2; PGC 1, 2, 3)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Use terminology specific to the emerging disciplines of homeland security and emergency management.
    1. Describe terms associated with security and emergency management.
    2. Use terminology associated with security and emergency management.
  2. Explain the historical context and current operations of the various agencies comprising homeland security and emergency management in the United States.
    1. Explain the unique qualities of United States federalism and its impact on homeland security.
    2. Explain the history of emergency management in the United States.
    3. Describe the events that led to the creation of the Department of Homeland Security.
    4. Identify the organization of the Department of Homeland Security and state and local infrastructures currently charged with the homeland security mission.
  3. Explain the statutory authority pertinent to current Department of Homeland Security service providers.
    1. Identify the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and implementing legislation.
    2. Identify the Homeland Security Presidential Preparedness Directives.
    3. Discuss the recommendations of the 9/11 Commission.
    4. Discuss the constitutional implications of the USA Patriot Act.
  4. Interpret the characteristics of all-hazards threats to homeland security.
    1. Describe and discuss the threat of natural disasters.
    2. Describe and discuss the threat of technological disasters.
    3. Describe and discuss the threat of man-made disasters.
    4. Describe critical infrastructure vulnerabilities in the United States.
  5. Explain the statutory authority pertinent to current Department of Homeland Security service providers.
    1. Discuss the role of mitigation plans, actions, and programs.
    2. Describe the role of prevention and preparedness plans, actions, and programs.
    3. Differentiate between the roles of the private sector in mitigation, prevention, and preparedness.
    4. Discuss best practices in an all-hazards approach to mitigation, prevention, and preparedness.
  6. Interpret response and recovery strategies used by various homeland security stakeholders.
    1. Describe federal, state, and local response and recovery responsibilities.
    2. Explain the National Incident Management System and the National Response Framework.
    3. Describe private sector and non-governmental organization (NGO) roles in response and recovery efforts.
  7. Discuss the importance of communication systems within the context of homeland security.
    1. Discuss issues of interoperability in tactical emergency communications.
    2. Identify the components of pre-event risk communications.
    3. Identify the components of event emergency communications.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

 
Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Articulate the roles and responsibilities of key Criminal Justice and Homeland Security agencies and organizations.
  2. Demonstrate “all-hazards” planning, mitigation, response and recovery.
  3. Apply mitigation and crisis intervention strategies used by integrated disaster response teams to diverse citizen populations.
  4. Articulate the psychology and history of domestic and international terrorism.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.