HDM 103 Information and Intelligence Sharing in Homeland Security


Campus Location:
Dover
Effective Date:
2019-51
Prerequisite:
ENG 090 or ENG 091, SSC 100 or concurrent
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
0.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course introduces systems and methods used by United States intelligence agents; the venues and jurisdictional limits of various intelligence agencies; and the legal bases for intelligence gathering, analysis, and dissemination for homeland security purposes.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Hybrid Course
Online Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Use terminology specific to the intelligence community, and explain the historical context and current operations of the various agencies comprising the intelligence community. (CCC 4, 5; PGC1, 4)
  2. Interpret the intelligence-gathering capability that involves threats to the homeland. (CCC1, 2, 4, 5; PGC 1, 2, 4)
  3. Discuss current as well as future intelligence activities capabilities. (CCC 1, 2, 4; PGC 1, 2, 3)
  4. Describe the processes by which information is acquired, converted into intelligence, and made available. (CCC 3, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Use terminology specific to the intelligence community, and explain the historical context and current operations of the various agencies comprising the intelligence community.
    1. Describe the organization of the United States Intelligence Community.
    2. Use terms associated with intelligence gathering, analysis, and dissemination in the intelligence community.
    3. Describe the main historical legacy of the United States Intelligence Community.
    4. Discuss the 9/11 Commission’s recommendations affecting the intelligence community.
    5. Define the roles and responsibilities of the Director of National Intelligence.
  2. Interpret the intelligence-gathering capability that involves threats to the homeland.
    1. Identify the roles and responsibilities of each member of the intelligence community, including their relationships with law enforcement and homeland security authorities.
    2. Compare and contrast the different collection disciplines available such as signal intelligence, imagery and human intelligence, and measurement and signature intelligence as well as open-source intelligence.
    3. Recognize the role of the various federal intelligence collection agencies such as the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), National Security Agency (NSA), and the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA).
    4. Describe the military’s role in gathering intelligence.
  3. Discuss current as well as future intelligence activities capabilities.
    1. Discuss the role of the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC).
    2. Explain the role of the state fusion centers.
    3. Explain the analytical component of the United States Intelligence Community.
    4. Identify potential weapons of mass destruction and their likely effects.
    5. Describe the intelligence collection; analytical process; and dissemination of accurate, timely, and objective intelligence.
    6. Identify effective counterintelligence measures that enhance and protect intelligence-gathering activities.
  4. Describe the processes by which information is acquired, converted into intelligence, and made available.
    1. Explain each phase of the intelligence cycle: planning and direction, collection, processing, production and analysis, and dissemination.
    2. Explain the assessment of threats and how to develop effective options in response.
    3. Discuss the debate surrounding the need to collect intelligence covertly.
    4. Recognize the importance of applying security classifications to sources and methods of intelligence collection capabilities.
    5. Describe the United States classification system: Top Secret, Secret, Confidential, For Official Use Only, Law Enforcement Sensitive, and Sensitive Security Information (SSI).
    6. Describe the way intelligence is stored, processed, viewed, shared, and transmitted through various information-sharing systems such as Regional Information Sharing System/Automated Trusted Information Exchange, InfraGard, state and local fusion center web services, the Homeland Security Information Network (HSIN), and Law Enforcement Online.
    7. Describe and discuss the use of technology such as Internet searching, data mining, and pattern recognition in intelligence gathering.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

 
Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Articulate the roles and responsibilities of key Criminal Justice and Homeland Security agencies and organizations.
  2. Demonstrate “all-hazards” planning, mitigation, response and recovery.
  3. Apply mitigation and crisis intervention strategies used by integrated disaster response teams to diverse citizen populations.
  4. Articulate the psychology and history of domestic and international terrorism.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.