HIS 111 United States History: Pre-Civil War


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Dover, Stanton, Wilmington
Effective Date:
2018-51
Prerequisite:
ENG 090 or ENG 091 or EAP 093 or higher, SSC 100 or concurrent
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
0.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course is a survey of colonial America and United States history through 1877. The course covers political, social, cultural, and economic factors that shaped the pattern of life in the United States through the period of Reconstruction.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Hybrid Course
Online Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Name and describe the major types of evidence used in conducting historical research. (CCC 1, 2, 5)
  2. Explain the importance of major philosophers, political thought, and documents that became the foundation of our nation. (CCC 1, 2, 5)
  3. Analyze the events that led to the Revolutionary War. (CCC 1, 2, 5)
  4. Discuss the importance of the Constitutional Convention and the Constitution in determining the future of the United States. (CCC 1, 2, 5)
  5. Discuss the beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors of European explorers toward indigenous inhabitants of North America. (CCC 1, 2, 4, 5)
  6. Describe the structure of the English colonial system established in North America. (CCC 1, 2, 5)
  7. Describe the effects of American expansionism, slavery, and industrial development on the groups impacted by these activities. (CCC 1, 2, 4, 5)
  8. Analyze the uneasy alliance that emerged in the early 19th century among political, economic, and nationalistic values. (CCC 1, 2, 4, 5)
  9. Analyze key factors that moved the nation toward the Civil War. (CCC 1, 2, 4, 5)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Name and describe the major types of evidence used in conducting historical research.
    1. Identify the major research techniques used to study history.
    2. Recognize and/or describe each of these types of research.
    3. Select which research method would be appropriate in a sample situation.
  2. Explain the importance of major philosophers, political thought, and documents that became the foundation of our nation.
    1. Identify the major philosophers whose ideas shaped early American democracy.
    2. Identify and/or list and describe the major political documents that formed the basis for our nation.
    3. Explain the early theories of government and the compromises that emerged.
  3. Analyze the events that led to the Revolutionary War.
    1. Identify the major events that led to the Revolutionary War.
    2. Recognize and/or summarize the views of the British, French, Colonists, and Native Americans.
    3. Identify and/or describe events that were turning points during the war.
    4. Analyze the views of each side for its strengths and weaknesses.
  4. Discuss the importance of the Constitutional Convention and the Constitution in determining the future of the United States.
    1. Identify and/or list basic factors that created the need for a Constitutional Convention.
    2. Explain the Constitution’s importance and why it is called a living document.
    3. Identify and/or discuss events related to the Constitution that changed the course of American history.
  5. Discuss the beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors of European explorers toward indigenous      inhabitants of North America.
    1. Identify and/or list the countries that sent explorers to the New World.
    2. Identify specific explorers; the reasons for their explorations, and the outcomes of their exploits.
    3. Compare and contrast the treatment of indigenous people by the various exploring groups.
  6. Describe the structure of the English colonial system established in North America.
    1. Explain the meaning of the English colonial system.
    2. State the purpose and success of this system.
    3. Discuss the ultimate failure of this system.
  7. Describe the effects of American expansionism, slavery, and industrial development on the groups impacted by these activities.
    1. Explain the series of events known as American expansionism, slavery, and industrial development.
    2. Identify the various groups impacted by these events.
    3. Discuss how each group was impacted.
  8. Analyze the uneasy alliance that emerged in the early 19th century among political, economic, and nationalistic values.
    1. Explain what is meant by an uneasy alliance.
    2. Identify major alliances and how they affected political, economic, and nationalistic values.
  9. Analyze key factors that moved the nation toward the Civil War.
    1. Identify major events that moved the nation towards the Civil War.
    2. Identify and/or discuss the major issues and philosophical differences that moved the nation towards the Civil War.
    3. Identify and/or discuss major personalities who contributed to the nation's movement toward the Civil War.
    4. Discuss the Civil War and its impact on the nation.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

 
Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

None

Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.