HIS 200 World History I


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Dover, Stanton, Wilmington
Effective Date:
2018-51
Prerequisite:
ENG 090 or ENG 091
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
0.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course surveys world history from antiquity through the sixteenth century. Topics include political, social, economic, and cultural developments that shaped the patterns of life on the African, American, Asian, and European landmasses.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Hybrid Course
Online Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Examine how the development of agriculture led to the rise of states and civilizations. (CCC 1, 2)
  2. Compare state formation in Shang China to Mesopotamia and Egypt and micro-societies in the South Pacific and Aegean Sea. (CCC 1, 2)
  3. Evaluate the connection among empires, war, religion, and trade. (CCC 1, 2)
  4. Discuss the impact of axial age ideas, and explain their effect on the advancement of civilization. (CCC 1, 2)
  5. Evaluate the forces that influenced the spread of world religions and the development of universalizing religions. (CCC1, 2, 5)
  6. Evaluate what causes empires and states to fall and what leads to the rise and organization of new empires and states. (CCC 1, 2)
  7. Conduct an historical analysis of past events by relating them to contemporary issues.  (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5)
  8. Name and describe the major types of evidence used in doing historical research. (CCC 1, 5, 6)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Examine how the development of agriculture led to the rise of states and civilizations
    1. Compare the science of human evolution to cross-cultural creation narratives of origin.
    2. Describe human ways of life and cultural developments from 200,000 to 12,000 years ago.
    3. Compare the ways communities around the world shifted to settled agriculture.
    4. Analyze the significance that the shift to settled agriculture had for social organization across global regions.
    5. Explain the religious, social, and political developments that accompanied early urbanization in the river basin societies from 3500 to 2000 before common era (BCE).
  2. Compare state formation in Shang China to Mesopotamia and Egypt and micro-societies in the South Pacific and Aegean Sea.
    1. Explain the relationship between climate change and human settlement patterns in the second millennium BCE.
    2. Compare the varied processes by which territorial states formed and interacted with each other in Egypt and Southwest Asia.
    3. Examine and explain the development and role geography played in the development of micro-societies in the South Pacific and Aegean Sea.
  3. Evaluate the connection among empires, war, religion, and trade.
    1. Describe the factors that contributed to the rise of early empires in 1250 to 325 BCE and the characteristics of these empires.
    2. Compare empire formation, or lack thereof, in Southwest Asia, South Asia, and East Asia between 1250 and 325 BCE.
    3. Analyze the relationships between empires and the peoples on their peripheries in Southwest Asia, South Asia, and East Asia.
  4. Discuss the impact of axial age ideas, and explain their effect on the advancement of civilization.
    1. Describe the challenges that Afro-Eurasian empires and states faced in the first millennium BCE.
    2. Identify axial age thinkers, and analyze their ideas.
    3. Compare the range of solutions the axial age thinkers devised.
    4. Explain the relationship between axial age thinkers across Afro-Eurasia and the political and social situations to which they were responding.
    5. Compare the political, cultural, and social developments across Afro-Eurasia with those occurring in the Americas and sub-Saharan Africa.
    6. Describe Hellenism, and explain its impact across Afro-Eurasia.
    7. Analyze the political changes that shaped Central and South Asia in the aftermath of Alexander’s incursion on the region.
    8. Evaluate the forces that influenced the spread of Buddhism in this period.
    9. Trace the early routes of the Silk Roads, and assess their importance in connecting Afro-Eurasia.
  5. Evaluate the forces that influenced the spread of world religions and the development of universalizing religions.
    1. Analyze the relationship between empires and universalizing religions in the Roman and Sasanian empires and the Gupta and Wei dynasties.
    2. Analyze the relationship between empires and universalizing religions in South Asia and China.
    3. Explain why universalizing religions developed to varying degrees in Afro-Eurasia but did not develop elsewhere in the world.
    4. Describe and explain the spread of Islam, Buddhism, and Christianity.
    5. Evaluate the relationship between religion, empire, and commercial exchange across Afro-Eurasia during this period.
    6. Compare the organizational structures of the Abbasids, Tang China, and Christendom.
    7. Compare the internal divisions within the Islamic, Tang, and Christian worlds.
    8. Describe the varied social and political forces that shaped the Islamic world, China, and Europe; evaluate the degree to which these forces integrated cultures and geographic areas.
    9. Compare the role that religions and migrations played in forging unified identities in Europe, India, and the Islamic worlds.
    10. Compare the role religious belief systems played in rebuilding Europe and Islam in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.
  6. Evaluate what causes empires and states to fall and what leads to the rise and organization of new empires and states.
    1. Identify the features that made Han China and Imperial Rome globalizing empires.
    2. Describe the development of the Han dynasty from its beginnings through the third century CE.
    3. Explain the process by which Rome transitioned from a minor city-state to a dominating Mediterranean power.
    4. Compare Han China with Imperial Rome in terms of their respective political authority, economy, cultural developments, and military expansion.
    5. Compare the ways rulers rebuilt unified states and their levels of success in China, Islam, and Europe
  7. Conduct an historical analysis of past events by relating them to contemporary issues.
    1. Identify contemporary economic, social, and political issues.
    2. Connect contemporary issues with their historical origins.
  8. Name and describe the major types of evidence used in doing historical research.
    1. Identify primary and secondary sources.
    2. Distinguish between a primary and secondary source.
    3. Assess the value of primary and secondary sources in historical research.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

 
Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

None

Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.