HMS 122 Theories of Counseling


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Dover, Wilmington
Effective Date:
2018-51
Prerequisite:
HMS 121, PSY 121, ENG 101, SSC 100 or concurrent
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
0.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course is an overview of basic counseling theories and techniques in terms of the client-worker relationship.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

All campus program and policy manuals

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Describe characteristics of an effective counselor. (CCC 2, 4; PGC 2, 4, 7).
  2. Examine general counseling practice issues and guidelines related to a counselor’s behaving ethically, managing values, using power, handling self-disclosure, therapeutically responding to client behavior, and preventing counselor burnout. (CCC 1, 2, 4; PGC 2, 4, 5, 6, 7)
  3. Explain the basic assumptions about human nature, goals, key concepts, roles of the client and counselor, nature of the therapeutic relationship, and major techniques and procedures’ advantages and disadvantages. (CCC 2, 4; PGC 2, 3, 4, 6, 7)
  4. Compare and contrast the dimensions of theories in the field. (CCC 2; PGC 1, 3, 4)
  5. Combine complementary elements from different theories in preparation for application to the practice of helping. (CCC 2, 4; PGC 2, 3, 4)
  6. Formulate and analyze a personal philosophy of counseling. (CCC 2, 4; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Describe characteristics of an effective counselor.
    1. Identify and explain characteristics of effective counselors.
    2. Identify and explain effective versus non-effective counselor characteristics.
  2. Examine general counseling practice issues and guidelines related to a counselor’s behaving ethically, managing values, using power, handling self-disclosure, therapeutically responding to client behavior, and preventing counselor burnout.
    1. Explain the concept of professional values and personal values and the impact on the therapeutic relationship.
    2. Describe the therapeutic use of power by the counselor, and differentiate use versus misuse of power by the counselor.
    3. Describe types of counselor self-disclosure and the impact of self-disclosure on the therapeutic relationship.
    4. Identify common practice issues and client behaviors encountered by novice counselors.
    5. Explain approaches for the counselor to effectively manage their own anxiety, fear of mistakes, potential for burn-out, and other common practice challenges encountered by novice counselors.
    6. Describe ethical principles for the therapeutic relationship.
  3. Explain the basic assumptions about human nature, goals, key concepts, roles of the client and counselor, nature of the therapeutic relationship, and major techniques and procedures’ advantages and disadvantages.
    1. Explain the impact of each theory’s beliefs about human nature on each theory’s approach to helping.
    2. Describe each theory’s goals and their relationship to the theory’s other dimensions.
    3. Explain each theory’s key concepts that support the theory’s system of helping.
    4. Describe the roles and tasks of the client and counselor for each theory.
    5. Explain each theory’s major techniques and how these fit into the therapeutic process.
    6. State the advantages and disadvantages of each theoretical approach.
  4. Compare and contrast the theories’ dimensions.
    1. Distinguish among the theoretical approaches that emphasize cognitive, affective, and behavioral dimensions; past versus present; and consciousness versus unconsciousness.
    2. Analyze and apply the key concepts, goals, appropriate techniques, and procedures of each theory to the relationship, roles, and responsibilities of the counselor and client.
  5. Combine complementary elements from different theories in preparation for application to the practice of helping.
    1. Analyze and organize the elements of each theory in terms of complementary approaches to counseling.
    2. Identify elements of complementary approaches that could be integrated into the specified approach when given a specific theory.
    3. Explain the rationale for integrating the elements identified in 5.2.
  6. Formulate and analyze a personal philosophy of counseling.
    1. Develop a philosophy of counseling that reflects personal beliefs about the nature of human behavior, the basic tenets of human needs, and the principles and approaches of counseling that  most effectively address such behavior and needs. 
    2. Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of the principles selected, beliefs about the counselor-client relationship, personal strengths and characteristics brought to the relationship, and consideration of ethical guidelines.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

 
Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Create and maintain effective and professional documents relevant to Human Services agencies.
  2. Interact ethically and professionally within the Human Services field.
  3. Apply information to identify client’s strengths, weaknesses, and resources to create a treatment plan.
  4. Provide effective client services at an entry level by utilizing professional Human Services principles and practices.
  5. Establish effective working relationships within the Human Services arena.
  6. Apply basic management and leadership skills in Human Services environments, including time management, organization, and the ability to follow directions.
  7. Utilize feedback to assess the effect of oneself on Human Services outcomes and make adjustments accordingly.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.