IET 209 Survey in Production, Planning, and Control


Campus Location:
Georgetown
Effective Date:
2018-52
Prerequisite:
ENG 102, EDT 252, EDD 273
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
2.00 lecture hours/week
2.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This advanced course covers product development and production manufacturing. Determination of economical manufacturing methods, selection of materials and machinery, estimation of materials and labor costs, production planning and scheduling, and the layout of a production line are covered.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

Notebook, scale, calculator and flash drive/data storage

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Identify the basic components, governing principles, utilization, and advantages/disadvantages of production lines. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
  2. Identify the basic components, governing principles, utilization, and advantages/disadvantages of programmable automation.(CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 2, 3, 5)
  3. Identify the main components of the manufacturing engineering function within a manufacturing organization. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)
  4. Categorize the main components of production planning and control within a manufacturing organization. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
  5. Work as a team member to develop a design and manufacturing process for a hypothetical mechanical product. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Identify the basic components, governing principles, utilization, and advantages/disadvantages of production lines.
    1. Identify the main components of a manual production line.
    2. Identify the main components of an automated production line.
    3. Determine the minimum number of workstations required for a production line for a specific product.
    4. Calculate line balance for a production line.
    5. Analyze the theoretical efficiency of a production line.
  2. Identify the basic components, governing principles, utilization, and advantages/disadvantages of programmable automation.
    1. Describe the main components of a numerical control (NC) system.
    2. Perform basic positioning, precision, and accuracy calculations for an NC system.
    3. Explain the differences, similarities, advantages, and disadvantages between open-loop and closed-loop NC systems.
    4. Identify the components of an industrial robotic system.
    5. Describe the control systems used for industrial robotic systems.
  3. Identify the main components of the manufacturing engineering function within a manufacturing organization.
    1. Describe how process planning is used in the manufacturing environment.
    2. Prepare a route sheet for a hypothetical component part.
    3. Explain how designing for manufacturability can reduce product cost and reduce the time it takes to bring a new product to market.
    4. Outline the general principles and guidelines in designing for manufacturability.
    5. Outline the process of concurrent engineering and how it is applied to new product development.
    6. Describe the main types of rapid prototyping and how they are used in product development.
    7. Describe the key considerations in incorporating ergonomics in the design of manufacturing and assembly workstations.
    8. Discuss the major factors influencing the quality of manufactured goods and how they can be monitored, controlled, and continuously improved to increase quality.
  4. Categorize the main components of production planning and control within a manufacturing organization.
    1. Define the role of aggregate planning and master production scheduling in manufacturing.
    2. Describe the processes and techniques used in inventory control.
    3. Calculate economic order quantities for a hypothetical product.
    4. Outline the process of material requirement planning.
    5. Outline the process of workstation, machine, shop, and line capacity requirement planning.
    6. Describe how lean production is used in the manufacturing environment to reduce costs and inventory size
  5. Work as a team member to develop a design and manufacturing process for a hypothetical mechanical product.
    1. Conduct a market review for a hypothetical mechanical product.
    2. Develop a design for a mechanical product.
    3. Prepare engineering, working, and assembly drawings.
    4. Specify materials of construction, production methods, and assembly techniques.
    5. Develop a detailed bill of materials (BOM) and a yield analysis.
    6. Generate route sheets for components and component assembly.
    7. Prepare an economy-of-scale analysis for one or more components.
    8. Design a production line, including work stations, machinery, tooling, and staffing.
    9. Prepare a cost estimate.
    10. Develop a business plan.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

Formative: Assignments (equally weighted)

35%

Summative: 2 Exams (equally weighted)

30%

Summative:  Production plan

15%

Summative: Oral presentation

20%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Apply the skills, techniques, and modern tools of the discipline to narrowly defined engineering technology activities.
  2. Apply mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require limited application of principles but extensive practical knowledge.
  3. Identify, analyze, and solve narrowly defined engineering technology problems.
  4. Demonstrate a commitment to quality, timeliness, professional development, and continuous improvement.
  5. Demonstrate technical competency in engineering materials, applied mechanics, and manufacturing methods.
  6. Apply in-depth technical competency in applied drafting practice emphasizing mechanical components and systems, as well as fundamentals of descriptive geometry, orthographic projection, sectioning, tolerancing and dimensioning, and computer aided drafting and design.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.