MET 264 Material Science


Campus Location:
Stanton
Effective Date:
2018-51
Prerequisite:
MAT 190
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
4.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
2.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course covers the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of metals, ceramics, plastic, and other engineering materials. Specific topics include ferrous metals, non-ferrous metals, heat treatment, common polymers, microstructure examination, composite systems, and corrosion. The laboratory component of the course instructs the student in a variety of standard methods for determining the properties of common materials.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Explain major mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of engineering materials. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6; PGC 1, 8)
  2. Perform common laboratory tests to determine material properties. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6; PGC 1, 8)
  3. Explain and apply common heat treatment techniques for ferrous and non-ferrous metals. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6; PGC 1, 8)
  4. Explain common mechanical, physical, and fabrication properties of ferrous and nonferrous metals. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6; PGC 1, 8)
  5. Interpret common mechanical, physical, and fabrication properties of polymers and composites. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6; PGC 1, 6, 8)
  6. Interpret common mechanical, physical, and fabrication properties of ceramics. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6; PGC 1, 8)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Explain major mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of engineering materials.
    1. Identify the states of matter.
    2. Define elements, compounds, and mixtures.
    3. Identify the system international (SI) units related to basic chemistry.
    4. Discuss the structure of atoms.
    5. Identify and use information from the periodic table.
    6. Differentiate among atoms, molecules, and ions.
    7. Write and balance simple chemical equations.
    8. Differentiate among ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds.
    9. Recognize any of the seven crystal systems.
    10. Describe the nature of chemical imperfections and dislocations.
    11. Differentiate among the basic categories of engineering materials (e.g., metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites) in terms of their chemical and mechanical characteristics.
    12. Differentiate by mechanical properties among metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites.
  2. Perform common laboratory tests to determine material properties.
    1. List the major material properties.
    2. Define the following physical properties: melting point, thermal, magnetic, electrical, optical, acoustic, and gravimetric
    3. Define the following mechanical properties: tensile strength, toughness, ductility, fatigue, hardness, creep resistance, heat distortion, compression strength, pressure velocity (PV) limit, fracture toughness, yield strength, and proportional limit.
    4. Relate material properties to material structure and state of processing.
    5. 2.5 Describe the basic factors involved in material selection.
    6. 2.6 Conduct the following mechanical tests, and write a brief report to explain the procedure and discuss tensile, impact, and torsion.
    7. 2.7 Conduct several hardness tests on a variety of materials, and write a brief report outlining the procedure and discussing the results.
    8. 2.8 Recognize the differences between stress-strain diagrams of ductile and brittle materials.
    9. 2.9 Describe the nature of oxidation, aqueous corrosion, and galvanic corrosion.
    10. 2.10 Describe the basic methods of corrosion prevention.
    11. 2.11 Describe the effects of processing on corrosion resistance for metals, polymers, and composites.
    12. Research, report on, and perform one standard corrosion test.
  3. Explain and apply common heat treatment techniques for ferrous and non-ferrous metals.
    1. List and explain the major steps in the steelmaking process.
    2. Differentiate between carbon steel and low-alloy steel.
    3. Differentiate among cast iron, steel, and stainless steel.
    4. Differentiate among Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), American Iron & Steel Institute (AISI), and unified numbering systems (UNS) classifications.
    5. Identify common metal-forming processes.
    6. List the applications of common types of steels, cast irons, and stainless steels.
    7. List the advantages and disadvantages of ferrous metals as compared to other engineering materials.
    8. List the common alloying elements, and describe the effects on the properties of ferrous metals.
    9. Prepare and examine at least one metallographic specimen, and write a brief report outlining the procedure and discussing the results.
  4. Explain common mechanical, physical, and fabrication properties of ferrous and non-ferrous metals.
    1. State the basic hardening process for steels.
    2. Identify and explain key features of a typical iron-carbon diagram.
    3. Describe the microstructural changes that occur during the various heat treatment processes of plain carbon steel.
    4. Identify and explain key features of a typical temperature-time-transformation (TTT) diagram.
    5. Differentiate among tempering, austempering, and mar tempering of steel.
    6. Differentiate between hardness and hardenability.
    7. State the nature of precipitation hardening.
    8. State the nature of normalizing.
    9. State the nature and key factors of surface hardening.
    10. State the nature of annealing.
    11. State the nature of stress relieving, including the effect on dislocation density.
    12. Cut five (5) specimens from two carbon steel stocks of different carbon content and heat treat as follows: hardened, tempered, normalized, and annealed.
    13. Prepare all five (5) specimens for metallurgical examination using the automatic polishing technique (instead of the manual method).
    14. Report on changes in structures of the heat treated specimens versus the control specimen, and report and explain any trends and correlation between hardness property and microstructure; identify original carbon steel stocks.
    15. Define non-ferrous metal.
    16. List the properties of aluminum alloys.
    17. State temper designation for aluminum alloys.
    18. List the advantages, disadvantages, properties, and applications of each of the following nonferrous metal alloy groupings: magnesium, titanium, copper, nickel, aluminum, and zinc.
    19. List the advantages and disadvantages of nonferrous metals as compared to other engineering materials.
    20. Identify and explain key features of a typical binary phase diagram for a non-ferrous metal.
  5. Interpret common mechanical, physical, and fabrication properties of polymers and composites.
    1. Differentiate between thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers.
    2. Differentiate among general use, engineering, and elastomeric thermoplastic polymers.
    3. Differentiate between addition polymerization and condensation polymerization.
    4. Differentiate between branching and cross-linking structures in polymeric materials.
    5. Identify the raw materials and processing steps for plastics.
    6. Differentiate among the following additives: plasticizer, filler, reinforcement, and stabilizer.
    7. Demonstrate a familiarity with the major mechanical properties of polymers.
    8. Differentiate among the reinforcement types used in composite manufacturing.
    9. Describe anisotropy as applied to both natural and manufactured fiber-reinforced composites.
    10. Perform an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard test for one mechanical property of plastic or composite.
    11. Describe the concept of property averaging.
    12. Describe specific strength and its significance.
    13. List the advantages and disadvantages of polymeric materials and composite materials as compared to other engineering materials.
    14. List the applications of polymeric and composite materials.
  6. Interpret common mechanical, physical, and fabrication properties of ceramics.
    1. Differentiate among ceramics, glasses, glass-ceramics, and cements.
    2. Differentiate among silicate, no silicate, and non-oxide ceramics.
    3. Differentiate among a network former, an intermediate, and a network modifier.
    4. Describe the following with respect to ceramics: brittle fracture, static fatigue, creep, thermal shock, and viscous deformation.
    5. Differentiate among transparency, translucency, and opacity.
    6. List the advantages and disadvantages of ceramic materials as compared to other engineering materials.
    7. List the applications of ceramic materials.
    8. Perform tests to determine the major mechanical properties of ceramics.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

 
Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Use effective problem-solving skills and make appropriate decisions relative to the technical field.
  2. Design basic mechanical systems with the use of computer-aided drafting equipment.
  3. Demonstrate basic computer literacy and knowledge of computer software applications in both the business and technical fields.
  4. Use hand and power tools for standard manufacturing operations.
  5. Conduct basic machining and welding operations; and perform basic programming of computer/numerically-controlled machines.
  6. Calculate forces, properly size structures and mechanical components, and perform standard materials testing procedures.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of basic AC and DC electrical control circuits.
  8. Select appropriate materials for basic mechanical applications.
  9. Review and/or design basic hydraulic/pneumatic power systems.
  10. Select basic machine components for mechanical systems.
  11. Exhibit professional traits, including the ability to work with minimal supervision, willingness to learn new skills, and contributing to team project efforts.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.