MET 271 Engineering Project


Campus Location:
Stanton
Effective Date:
2019-51
Prerequisite:
MET 225, MET 241, MET 242, ELC 248


Co-Requisites:

MET 245 

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
1.00 lecture hours/week
5.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

In this course, students participate in small group design in various fields of engineering technology such as machine design, fluid mechanics, pneumatics, hydraulics, electro-mechanics, and structures. Projects are taken from inception through a complete design process, including cost analysis and a final design report.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
 
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Research and choose among possible projects based on general need, interest, or specific client criteria. (CCC 1, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 3, 11)
  2. Identify project goals, objectives, measurement criteria, and constraints pertinent to the project. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 11)
  3. Compare and contrast several possible design concepts using the defined objectives, criteria, and constraints. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 3, 11)
  4. Select a specific design, fully detailing the decisions and reasoning that led to the choice. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 6, 8, 10, 11)
  5. Carry out the design project, and construct any apparatus involved within the limits of time and budget. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11)
  6. Develop a test program with criteria that measures the design against project goals and objectives. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 6, 11)
  7. Critique the performance of the design, and recommend potential improvements. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11)
  8. Prepare and present both a formal written project report and oral presentation detailing all aspects of the project. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,11)
  9. Use Inventor and/or MDSolids computer software to design individual and mating machine parts. (CCC 1, 2, 6; PGC 1, 2, 6, 8, 10)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Research and choose among possible projects based on general need, interest, or specific client criteria.
    1. Identify problems with existing systems, or find an unmet need.
    2. Benchmark similar systems.
    3. Create a decision matrix based on cost, time, and feasibility to justify project choice.
  2. Identify project goals, objectives, measurement criteria, and constraints pertinent to the project.
    1. Write a project proposal identifying goals, objectives, criteria, and constraints as they apply to the project.
  3. Compare and contrast several possible design concepts using the defined objectives, criteria, and constraints.
    1. Benchmark existing solutions.
    2. Brainstorm possible solutions.
    3. Create decision matrices to quantify design choices.
  4. Select a specific design, fully detailing the decisions and reasoning that led to the choice.
    1. Write a concept report detailing several possible design concepts using the defined goals, objectives, criteria, and constraints.
  5. Carry out the design project, and construct any apparatus involved within the limits of time and budget.
    1. Keep a detailed daily log book of all project activities, which will include the individual work done by team member, minutes of project group meetings, vendor contacts, sources of equipment information and specifications, drawings, calculations, and purchase orders.
  6. Develop a test program with criteria that measures the design against project goals and objectives.
    1. Create a list of metrics for evaluating a client’s needs/wants.
    2. Identify a target value or range for each metric.
    3. Identify activities for measuring metric values.
  7. Critique the performance of the design, and recommend potential improvements.
    1. Perform activities to measure metrics.
    2. Evaluate measurements against target values.
    3. Redesign any areas that do not meet the criteria.
    4. Identify methods of optimization for the next iteration of the prototype.
  8. Prepare and present both a formal written project report and oral presentation detailing all aspects of the project.
    1. Prepare and submit a formal written group project report.
    2. Prepare and present a formal group oral presentation on the project using appropriate audio-visual aids.
  9. Use Inventor and/or MDSolids computer software to design individual and mating machine parts.
    1. Create structures on MDSolids, including dimensions and angles.
    2. Locate appropriate loads on structures, including magnitude and direction.
    3. Calculate member forces, and compare results with manual solutions.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

Meeting milestones (equally weighted) (summative)

35%

Individual contribution (Logbooks) (formative)

30%

Portfolio (summative)

10%

Presentation (summative)

5%

User manual (summative)

5%

Design (summative)

5%

Drawing creation / machining parts (summative)

5%

NOCTI (National Occupational Competency Testing Institute): standardized test for Engineering Technology. (summative)

5%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Use effective problem-solving skills and make appropriate decisions relative to the technical field.
  2. Design basic mechanical systems with the use of computer-aided drafting equipment.
  3. Demonstrate basic computer literacy and knowledge of computer software applications in both the business and technical fields.
  4. Use hand and power tools for standard manufacturing operations.
  5. Conduct basic machining and welding operations; and perform basic programming of computer/numerically-controlled machines.
  6. Calculate forces, properly size structures and mechanical components, and perform standard materials testing procedures.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of basic AC and DC electrical control circuits.
  8. Select appropriate materials for basic mechanical applications.
  9. Review and/or design basic hydraulic/pneumatic power systems.
  10. Select basic machine components for mechanical systems.
  11. Exhibit professional traits, including the ability to work with minimal supervision, willingness to learn new skills and contributing to team project efforts.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.