MLT 291 Clinical Practicum


Campus Location:
Georgetown
Effective Date:
2020-51
Prerequisite:
MLT 121, MLT 221, MLT 251, MLT 261
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
7.00 credits
0.00 lecture hours/week
36.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course provides an intense exposure to the clinical laboratory environment to familiarize the student with the scope of work, variety of tests, and automation found within each laboratory department.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

Rotations are scheduled in hematology, urinalysis, microbiology, clinical chemistry, serology, blood bank, and phlebotomy.

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Describe various diseases and conditions and how laboratory tests correlate with these diseases.  (CCC 1, 2, 5; PGC 1, 2, 6)
  2. Identify, describe, and collect the types of samples used in the clinical laboratory, and identify the variables that can adversely affect laboratory results.  (CCC 2, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 4, 6)
  3. Perform testing of analytes using a variety of methods to include both manual and automated methods in all clinical sections of the laboratory.  (CCC 2, 3, 4, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4)
  4. Evaluate laboratory data using the multirule system for quality control after calculating statistics in all clinical sections of the laboratory. (CCC 2, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 3)
  5. Evaluate the scientific principles, test methodologies, and proper use of instrumentation as well as safety measures and personal protective equipment used in all sections of the clinical laboratory. (CCC 2, 4, 5, 6; PGC 2, 3, 4, 5)
  6. Discuss the major normal and abnormal constituents of body fluids such as blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, amniotic fluid, seminal fluid, peritoneal fluid, pericardial fluid, and pleural fluid. (CCC 1, 5, 6; PGC 1, 2, 5, 6).
  7. Identify medical terminology and abbreviations in the proper context.  (CCC 1, 5; PGC 2, 4, 6).
  8. Calculate laboratory reference ranges and test results from various formulas using both patient and hypothetical data. (CCC 6; PGC 1, 2, 3).

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Describe various diseases and conditions and how laboratory tests correlate with these diseases. 
    1. Discuss the clinical significance of performing tests in the chemistry, hematology, serology, microbiology, and immunohematology and urinalysis laboratories. 
    2. Correlate abnormal results with disease processes. 
  2. Describe, identify, and collect the types of samples used in the clinical laboratory, and identify the variables that can adversely affect laboratory results. 
    1. Identify and evaluate patient specimens as acceptable or unacceptable for analysis in chemistry, hematology, serology, microbiology, and immunohematology and urinalysis laboratories.
    2. Explain when to reject a specimen. 
    3. Collect appropriate patient specimens to be used for testing in chemistry, hematology, serology, microbiology, and immunohematology and urinalysis laboratories.
    4. Correctly process donor blood units for crossmatches and transfusion. 
    5. Inspect donor blood units for abnormal appearance. 
  3. Perform testing of analytes using a variety of methods to include both manual and automated methods in all clinical sections of the laboratory. 
    1. Explain how to perform manual and automated cell counts.
    2. Explain how to perform erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), sickle cell prep, and reticulocyte counts using manual and automated methods. 
    3. Analyze and interpret antibody screens and panels in blood bank.
    4. Analyze and interpret worksheets from crossmatches. 
    5. Perform manual cell counts using Unopettes and hemacytometers.
    6. Perform ESR, sickle cell prep, and reticulocyte counts.
    7. Correctly perform and interpret antibody screens and antibody panels.
    8. Correctly set up, perform, and interpret crossmatch. 
    9. Explain how to perform panels on automated chemistry and microbiology analyzers.
  4. Evaluate laboratory data using multirule system for quality control after calculating statistics in all clinical sections of the laboratory. 
    1. Discuss how quality control (QC) is monitored for each manual procedure and automated instrument in the chemistry, hematology, serology microbiology, and immunohematology and urinalysis laboratories.
    2. Evaluate QC records, and discuss appropriate corrective actions to be taken should QC values fall outside established limits in each of the laboratory departments. 
    3. Perform daily QC procedures used in the chemistry, hematology, serology, microbiology, and immunohematology and urinalysis laboratories. 
    4. Maintain legible QC records for each of the procedures in the chemistry, hematology, serology, microbiology, and immunohematology and urinalysis laboratories.
  5. Evaluate the scientific principles, test methodologies, and proper use of instrumentation as well as safety measures and personal protective equipment used in all sections of the clinical laboratory.
    1. Explain the principles of each of the instruments used in the chemistry, hematology, serology, microbiology, and immunohematology and urinalysis laboratories. 
    2. Explain standard precautions to be used when working in the laboratory. 
    3. Explain documentation procedures for accidents that occur during specimen procurement and handling.
    4. Correctly operate each of the instruments used in the chemistry, hematology, serology, microbiology, and immunohematology and urinalysis laboratories. 
    5. Demonstrate how to perform maintenance and minor troubleshooting for instrumentation used in the chemistry, hematology, serology, microbiology, and immunohematology and urinalysis laboratories. 
    6. Calibrate instruments accurately in the chemistry, hematology, serology, microbiology, and immunohematology and urinalysis laboratories. 
    7. Properly use all personal protective equipment that is required when using standard precautions. 
    8. Perform procedure for disposing of used needles, slides sharps, and biohazardous materials. 
  6. Discuss the major normal and abnormal constituents of body fluids such as blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, amniotic fluid, seminal fluid, peritoneal fluid, pericardial fluid, and pleural fluid.
    1. Explain the clinical significance of abnormal test results for tests performed in the chemistry, hematology, serology, microbiology, and immunohematology and urinalysis laboratories.
    2. Determine problems associated with incompatible crossmatch. 
  7. Identify medical terminology and abbreviations in the proper context. 
    1. Analyze and interpret a case study.
    2. Analyze and interpret a scientific article in a laboratory journal. 
  8. Calculate laboratory reference ranges and test results from various formulas using both patient and hypothetical data.
    1. Calculate a creatinine clearance test result using data from laboratory testing.
    2. Calculate red blood cell indices using data from laboratory testing.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

Summative: Case Study

20%

Summative: Journal Presentation

10%

Formative: Assignments – (equally weighted)

6%

Summative: Tests – (4) (equally weighted)

6%

Summative: BOC Exam

10%

Summative: Competency Evaluation  (4) (equally weighted)

6%

Summative: Technical Performance Evaluation (4) (equally weighted)

15%

Summative: Practical (4) (equally weighted)

21%

Summative: Professional Behaviors Evaluation (4) (equally weighted)

6%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

AHTAASMLT

  1. Collect, process, and analyze biological specimens and other related substances.
  2. Recognize factors that affect procedures and results, and take appropriate actions within predetermined limits when corrections are indicated.
  3. Perform and monitor quality control within predetermined limits.
  4. Apply basic scientific principles for application in medical laboratory procedures and methodologies.
  5. Employ safety principles according to health and environmental regulations.
  6. Correlate laboratory results with common disease processes and treatments for diagnosis.
  7. Demonstrate professional conduct and interpersonal communication skills with patients, laboratory personnel, other healthcare personnel, and the public.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.