OTA 222 Pediatric Intervention


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Wilmington
Effective Date:
2018-51
Prerequisite:
BIO 121, OTA 110, OTA 120
Co-Requisites:

none

Course Credits and Hours:
4.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
3.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course introduces evaluation and application of occupational therapy techniques in treating the pediatric and young adult populations and individuals with developmental disabilities across the life span.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

Campus program and policy manuals

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Demonstrate professional behaviors while studying the application and demonstration of occupational therapy treatment techniques. (CCC 4; PGC 2)
  2. Describe the importance of occupation as an integral part of the philosophy of occupational therapy (OT). (CCC 2; PGC 1)
  3. Examine pediatric OT services in healthcare and educational settings. (CCC 1; PGC 1)
  4. Demonstrate how performance skills, client factors, and contexts influence occupational performance by designing an intervention plan. (CCC 2, 5; PGC 1)
  5. Describe key terms and concepts related to the roles of the registered occupational therapist (OTR) and certified occupational therapy assistant (COTA) in the occupational therapy process. (CCC 4; PGC 1)
  6. Describe and provide instruction in adaptive techniques to enhance occupational performance. (CCC 1, 2, 4; PGC 1, 2, 3, 4)
  7. Discuss and explain key concepts of intervention in school-based OT programs. (CCC 6; PGC 1)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Demonstrate professional behaviors while studying the application and demonstration of occupational therapy treatment techniques.
    1. Demonstrate appropriate classroom behaviors.
    2. Use sound judgment regarding safety of self and others by adhering to safety precautions during all activities.
    3. Self-assess, and modify responses as needed.
  2. Describe the importance of occupation as an integral part of the philosophy of occupational therapy (OT).
    1. Describe the concepts inherent in the philosophy of OT.
    2. Describe concepts associated with OT in pediatrics as occupation-based practice.
    3. Define parameters of human development involved in the primary occupational therapy theories.
    4. Describe basic features of theories that underlie the practice of OT.
    5. Identify the criteria used by OT practitioners to determine the initial and/or continued need for OT services.
    6. Identify interventions consistent with models of occupational performance for various pediatric conditions.
    7. Describe basic features of models of practice and frames of reference used with the pediatric population.
  3. Examine pediatric OT services in healthcare and educational settings.
    1. Outline general OT pediatric healthcare delivery and educational services.
    2. Describe federal and state legislation and regulations in healthcare and education that have influenced OT practice.
    3. Describe how OT services in healthcare, educational settings, and home and community-based programs are used to promote health and wellness and to prevent disease and disability in the pediatric and young adult population.
    4. Discuss the importance of participation in occupations to promote health and wellness in the adolescent population.
    5. Use effective written, oral, and non-verbal communication and work inter-professionally with those who provide services to individuals and groups in order to clarify each member’s responsibility.
  4. Demonstrate how performance skills, client factors, and contexts influence occupational performance by designing an intervention plan.
    1. Explain the importance of physical, social, and cultural contexts on treatment implementation.
    2. Describe the influence of behavioral issues and parental expectations on the child’s performance in areas of occupations.
    3. Discuss the effects of health, disability, disease processes, and traumatic injury to the child or young adult within the context of the family and society.
    4. Define and discuss key terms and concepts related to perceptual processing.
    5. Explain the implications of visual-perceptual problems on performance in areas of occupations.
    6. Describe treatment strategies for assisting children in improving or compensating for visual-perceptual problems.
    7. Given a specific reflex, righting reaction, and/or equilibrium reaction state the age range, test position, stimulus, and expected response.
    8. Describe the characteristics of normal and abnormal muscle tone and the effect on motor control.
    9. Identify appropriate treatment techniques to facilitate postural control.
    10. Describe inhibition and facilitation techniques.
    11. Describe the process of gross motor and fine motor development and coordination.
    12. Describe treatment strategies to improve fine motor and gross motor coordination.
    13. Describe concepts associated with cognitive development.
    14. Describe treatment strategies for assisting children to remediate or compensate for cognitive deficits.
    15. Define key terms and concepts related to Neuro-Developmental Treatment (NDT) and sensory integration (SI).
    16. Describe SI treatment principles, treatment activities, and precautions when working with a child or adolescent with sensory processing disorders.
    17. Accurately administer a pediatric assessment in a role-play situation.
    18. Demonstrate task analysis in the areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, context, and environments and client factors to implement the intervention plan throughout the OT process as appropriate to the setting and scope of practice.
    19. Select treatment interventions that address occupational profile, client factors, performance patterns, contexts, and performance skills and that are supported by evidence-based practice.
    20. Select, provide rationale, and implement relevant treatment strategies in a role-play situation to enhance safety, health and wellness, and performance in activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) adhering to safety precautions.
  5. Describe key terms and concepts related to the roles of the registered occupational therapist (OTR) and certified occupational therapy assistant (COTA) in the occupational therapy process.
    1. Discuss concepts inherent in the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework process.
    2. List primary reasons that evaluations are conducted, and discuss the variety of decisions pediatric occupational therapists make throughout the evaluation process.
    3. Describe the primary evaluation methods commonly used in pediatric occupational therapy, including the use of occupations.
    4. Articulate the importance of using statistics, tests, and measurements for the purpose of delivering evidence-based practice.
    5. Discuss concepts associated with the research process and research protocol.
    6. Identify the characteristics of commonly used standardized and non-standardized pediatric assessments.
    7. Describe the procedures necessary to become a competent user of standardized tests, while adhering to safety precautions.
    8. Explain the process of clinical reasoning when planning and implementing therapy with children and their families.
    9. Describe methods to enhance psychosocial development and to establish a positive therapy environment.
  6. Describe and provide instruction in adaptive techniques to enhance occupational performance.
    1. Describe the sequence of normal self-care development relative to the pediatric population.
    2. Identify issues that interfere with or delay the development of self-care skills.
    3. Describe intervention strategies to facilitate the participation in ADLs, IADLs, education, work, and social participation for the pediatric and adolescent population.
    4. Describe the need for and use of compensatory strategies when desired life tasks cannot be performed.
    5. Demonstrate and instruct in adapted techniques and equipment to enable feeding, eating, and swallowing performance for pediatric and young adult populations while adhering to safety precautions.
    6. Select and provide appropriate rationale, and implement relevant treatment and compensatory strategies in a role-play situation to improve performance in areas of occupation that support performance, participation, and well-being while adhering to safety precautions.
    7. Define key terms and concepts associated with play.
    8. Describe treatment strategies to facilitate play.
    9. Explain the role of the OTA in providing assistive technology services.
    10. Identify a variety of assistive devices to enhance occupational performance and foster participation and well-being for ADL, assistive listening devices, aids for low vision, adapted toys, switches and environmental control units, seating, positioning and mobility devices, alternative/augmentative communication devices, and computer access.
  7. Discuss and explain key concepts of intervention in school-based OT programs.
    1. Describe treatment goals and objectives of school-based, occupational therapy programs for students.
    2. Discuss when and how to use direct services, monitoring, and the consultative process as directed by the occupational therapist.
    3. Describe the role of OT in transition services.
    4. Describe effective collaboration strategies in early childhood and childhood.
    5. Discuss federal and state legislation that impacts the delivery of OT services in school-based practice.
    6. Discuss the performance skills that contribute to a child’s handwriting.
    7. Describe the role of OT in the evaluation and intervention of children with handwriting dysfunction in educational and clinical settings.
    8. Describe treatment techniques to improve handwriting skills.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

Summative Assessments

 

Exam #1

10%

Exam #2

10%

Exam #3

10%

Comprehensive Final Exam

20%

Lab Practical: Treatment Planning and Implementation

10%

Professional Behaviors

10%

Formative Assessments

         Quizzes

         Interprofessional Collaboration assignment

         Assistive Device Activity Presentation

         Competencies

30%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Demonstrate knowledge related to the occupational therapy assistant including patient/client interactions, therapeutic treatments, activity analysis, documentation, safety techniques, and therapeutic equipment.
  2. Exhibit effective nonverbal, verbal and written communication in patient/client and family interventions and education and in professional relationships.
  3. Perform competently a full range of occupational therapy skills with patients/clients and various populations as occupational beings.
  4. Exercise independent judgment and critical thinking in performance of occupational therapy, according to the profession’s standards of practice.
  5. Demonstrate professional patterns of behavior consistent with the profession's code of ethics.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.