PHY 205 General Physics I


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Dover, Stanton, Wilmington
Effective Date:
2020-51
Prerequisite:
MAT 180
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
4.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
3.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course introduces students to physics concepts and its applications to science and industry.  Topics include vectors, one and two-dimensional motion, work and energy, momentum, collisions, circular motion, gravity, rotational dynamics, mechanics of solids and fluids, fluids in motion, heat, and oscillations.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

The Mathematics/Physics Department recommends the use of a TI-84 Graphic Calculator.  Calculators with QWERTY keyboards are inappropriate for this course and will not be permitted in test situations.

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Hybrid Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Analyze constant velocity, constant acceleration, and projectile motions. (CCC 2, 6)
  2. Synthesize Newton’s laws of motion to one and two-dimensional situations. (CCC 2, 6)
  3. Analyze motion using work-energy and conservation of energy principles. (CCC 2, 6)
  4. Analyze motion, especially collisions, using impulse-momentum and conservation of momentum principles. (CCC 2, 6)
  5. Synthesize rotational motion equations and Newton’s laws of motion to determine motion variables in rotational motion. (CCC 2, 6)
  6. Apply mechanics concepts in determining physics phenomena in solids and liquids. (CCC 2, 6)
  7. Analyze thermal and calorimetric processes involving energy transfer via heat. (CCC 2, 6)
  8. Synthesize mechanics concepts and theorems in solving simple harmonic motion. (CCC 2, 6)
  9. Investigate physics principles using experimental techniques. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 5, 6)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Analyze constant velocity, constant acceleration, and projectile motions.
    1. Convert between physics units in both engineering (English) and scientific (SI) system of units.

    2. Employ the appropriate significant figure rules in determining the precision of numerical answers.

    3. Solve for unknown variables of motion in constant velocity motion using both algebraic and graphical methods.

    4. Solve for unknown variables of motion in linear accelerated motion (including free-fall) using both algebraic and graphical methods.
    5. Interpret and create motion diagrams and graphs from information provided.
    6. Differentiate between scalar and vector quantities and the type of arithmetic used with each quantity.
    7. Perform both scale drawing and component methods of vector arithmetic.
    8. Distinguish between the vertical and horizontal motion of objects launched at different angles.
    9. Calculate unknown variables of motion in projectile motion for objects launched at different angles.
  2. Synthesize Newton’s laws of motion to one and two-dimensional situations.
    1. Explain the motion of objects using Newton’s laws of motion.

    2. Differentiate between mechanical contact and long-range forces.
    3. Calculate the values of all mechanical contact and long-range forces from information provided.
    4. Construct free body diagrams and motion diagrams from information provided.
    5. Solve Newton’s second law problems involving single and interacting objects.
    6. Determine the unknown force(s) acting on objects in equilibrium and accelerated motion.
  3. Analyze motion using work-energy and conservation of energy principles.
    1. Calculate work, kinetic energy, gravitational potential energy, elastic potential energy, and power.

    2. Explain and calculate the motion of objects using the work-energy theorem.
    3. Distinguish between conservative and non-conservative forces.
    4. Apply the conservation of energy in both conservative and non-conservative forms to solve for motion variables.
    5. Calculate power and compare the effects of power, force, and work.
  4. Analyze motion, especially collisions, using impulse-momentum and conservation of momentum principles.
    1. Analyze motion and collisions using momentum and impulse principles.

    2. Calculate momentum and impulse.
    3. Apply the impulse-momentum theorem to study interaction between two objects.
    4. Apply conservation of momentum in both qualitative and quantitative situations.
    5. Analyze one dimensional elastic and inelastic collisions using conservation laws.
  5. Synthesize rotational motion equations and Newton’s law of motion to determine motion variables in rotational motion.
    1. Calculate the rotational equivalent of displacement, velocity, and acceleration in uniform rotational motion.

    2. Apply Newton’s second law with the concept of centripetal force to analyze uniform circular motion.
    3. Calculate the gravitational force between objects using Newton’s law of gravitation and explain the orbits of celestial objects.
    4. Determine the period and speed of satellites around different central bodies.
    5. Calculate torque and employ the equilibrium conditions to solve static problems with extended objects.
    6. Calculate the moment of inertia, net torque, and angular acceleration of rotating objects.
    7. Determine unknown motion variables in rotational dynamics.
  6. Apply mechanics concepts in determining physics phenomena in solids and liquids.
    1. Define and calculate mass, density, and pressure.

    2. Apply Pascal’s principle in both qualitative and quantitative situations.
    3. Investigate the effects of Archimedes principle and buoyancy of materials placed in fluids.
    4. Determine the variation of pressure in both static and moving ideal fluids.
    5. Solve fluid motion variables using both Equation of continuity and Bernoulli’s equation.
    6. Investigate strengths of solids by solving for stress, strain, and elastic moduli.
  7. Analyze thermal and calorimetric processes involving energy transfer via heat.
    1. Define temperature and temperature scales, and convert between these scales.

    2. Determine the amount of linear and volume thermal expansion in materials.
    3. Define heat, and solve specific heat and latent heat problems.
    4. Apply calorimetric principles to solve heat transfer problems involving materials.
  8. Synthesize mechanics concepts and theorems in solving simple harmonic motion.
    1. Define simple harmonic motion (SHM) in terms of Newton’s second law.

    2. Use force and energy concepts to solve for unknown motion variables in SHM.
    3. Use the reference circle and solve for position, velocity, and acceleration in terms of angular frequency and phase.
    4. Determine frequency, period, and amplitude for mass on spring and simple pendulum.
  9. Investigate physics principles using experimental techniques.
    1. Perform scientific measurements and calculations using significant digits.

    2. Compare and contrast constant velocity and constant accelerated motion by constructing and analyzing motion graphs of moving objects.
    3. Verify Galileo’s experiment of freely falling objects.
    4. Measure and contrast range in projectile motion for horizontal launch and non-zero angle launch.
    5. Verify that Newton’s second law of motion is valid using at least two experimental situations, one for equilibrium and another for accelerated motion.
    6. Determine centripetal force of an object in uniform circular motion.
    7. Compare and contrast elastic and inelastic collisions by determining momentum and energy transfer in colliding carts.
    8. Verify energy conservation for rolling bodies of different shapes down a ramp.
    9. Verify Archimedes principle.
    10. Determine specific heat capacity and latent heat of different objects.
    11. Determine the spring constant of a spring by static and dynamic experiments.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

3 – 4 Unit Tests* (summative) (equally weighted)

50%

Final Exam** (summative)

15%

Labs (summative) (equally weighted)

20%

Other – Homework, Quiz, Projects (formative)

15%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

None

Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.