PHY 282 Physics II with Calculus


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Dover, Stanton, Wilmington
Effective Date:
2020-51
Prerequisite:
MAT 282 and PHY 281
Co-Requisites:

None

Course Credits and Hours:
4.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
3.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

In this calculus-based physics course, students study electric fields, electric forces, electrical energy, capacitance, electric current, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, alternating current, and electromagnetic waves.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Analyze electrostatic systems using forces and fields created by discrete and continuous charge distribution. (CCC 2, 6)
  2. Analyze electrostatic systems using the concepts of electric potential energy and electric potential. (CCC 2, 6)
  3. Synthesize strategies for the investigation of direct current circuits. (CCC 2, 6)
  4. Employ the principles of magnetism to interacting current carrying wires and moving charged particles. (CCC 2, 6)
  5. Apply principles of electromagnetic induction. (CCC 2, 6)
  6. Generalize the principles of circuit analysis to alternating current circuits. (CCC 2, 6)
  7. Explain the behavior of electromagnetic waves. (CCC 2, 6)
  8. Investigate physics principles using experimental techniques. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 6)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Analyze electrostatic systems using forces, and fields created by discrete and continuous charge distribution.
    1. Discuss the structure of matter in terms of electric charge.

    2. Contrast the methods of charging objects.
    3. Apply Coulomb’s law to electrostatic arrangements of multiple charges.
    4. Explain the concept of the electric field and determine the field created by a single charge.
    5. Calculate resultant electric fields and forces using superposition of multiple electric fields.
    6. Apply integration to derive the electric field created by selected symmetric continuous charge distributions.
    7. Determine the electric flux and apply this concept to Gauss’s law.
    8. Apply Gauss’s law to determine the electric field created by symmetric charge distributions.
  2. Analyze electrostatic systems using the concepts of electric potential energy and electric potential.
    1. Calculate the electric potential energy of a charge placed in a constant electric field and of charge distributions.

    2. Compute the motion of charged particles in electric potentials using the conservation of energy principle.
    3. Differentiate the structure of equipotential surfaces and electric field lines around charge distributions.
    4. Calculate the electric potential created by arrangements of point charges.
    5. Apply integration to derive the electric potential created by selected symmetric continuous charge distributions.
    6. Calculate the capacitance, charge, voltage, and energy for a single capacitor and arrays of capacitors.
    7. Determine equations for and calculate the capacitance of symmetric charged plates.
  3. Synthesize strategies for the investigation of direct current circuits.
    1. Define and calculate electric current and electromotive force.

    2. Apply Ohm’s law in both vector and scalar form to determine electric properties of a uniform conductor.
    3. Calculate resistance and resistivity of wires and examine their temperature dependence.
    4. Compute power and energy in electrical circuits.
    5. Analyze circuits using series and parallel reductions and Kirchhoff’s rules.
    6. Determine the voltage and current as functions of time in resistor/capacitor (RC) circuits.
    7. Explain home power distribution and determine power used in household devices.
  4. Employ the principles of magnetism to interacting current carrying wires and moving charged particles.
    1. Differentiate between magnets, magnetic materials, and magnetic fields.

    2. Calculate the magnetic force on current-carrying wires and moving charged particles in magnetic fields.
    3. Determine the motion of charged particles in a magnetic field, and describe applications of this arrangements.
    4. Determine the magnetic force and torque on current-carrying conductors and use this information to explain the operation of electric motors.
    5. Determine the magnetic field created by moving charges and current elements.
    6. Calculate magnetic fields due to current-carrying wires and solenoids.
    7. Apply Ampere’s law to various configurations of current-carrying wires.
    8. Define magnetic moments and their relationship to permanent magnets.
  5. Apply principles of electromagnetic induction.
    1. Apply Faraday’s law to conducting wires in magnetic fields.

    2. Discuss and apply the working principles behind generators, motors, and transformers.
    3. Calculate motional electromotive force and induced electric field.
    4. Explain the phenomena of displacement current and recall the integral form of Maxwell’s equations.
    5. Calculate energy stored and energy density of a magnetic field.
    6. Define and calculate both mutual and self-inductance.
    7. Calculate the current and voltage in inductors.
    8. Determine the voltage and current as functions of time in resistor/inductor (RL) circuits.
    9. Determine the frequency and current in an inductor/capacitor (LC) circuits.
  6. Generalize the principles of circuit analysis to alternating current circuits.
    1. Distinguish between direct current and alternating current.

    2. Recall the characteristics of phasor diagrams
    3. Calculate root-mean-square and amplitude values of current, voltage, and power.
    4. Define and calculate reactance and impedance.
    5. Analyze resistor/inductor/capacitor (RLC) series and resonant circuits.
    6. Explain the use of transformers in electricity distribution, and determine voltage and power.
  7. Explain the behavior of electromagnetic waves.
    1. Describe how Maxwell’s equations imply the existence of electromagnetic waves.

    2. Describe the properties of electromagnetic waves.
    3. Calculate the magnetic field magnitude, electric field magnitude, and speed of electromagnetic waves.
    4. Calculate the energy and momentum of an electromagnetic wave.
    5. Determine the Poynting vector and intensity of an electromagnetic wave.
  8. Investigate physics principles using experimental techniques.
    1. Verify the force/charge relationship expressed by Coulomb’s law.

    2. Map the electric field and equipotential contours of two charge distributions.
    3. Assemble a configuration of batteries and capacitors and determine the voltage across each capacitor.
    4. Verify Ohm’s law using a resistor, and contrast the behavior of a nonlinear conductor (a diode)
    5. Construct an RC circuit and determine the value of its time constant.
    6. Measure the resistance, current, and voltage of a series/parallel combination of resistors.
    7. Measure the magnetic field created by a solenoid, and determine the number of turns in the solenoid.
    8. Produce a current by electromagnetic induction and measure its value.
    9. Measure the voltage and voltage in an alternating current RL or RC circuit.
    10. Measure the voltage/current phase relationship in an RLC circuit.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

3 – 4 Unit Tests* (summative, equally weighted)

50%

Final Exam** (summative)

15%

Labs (formative)

20%

Other – Homework, Quiz, Projects (formative)

15%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

None

Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.