POL 111 Political Science


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Dover, Stanton, Wilmington
Effective Date:
2018-51
Prerequisite:
ENG 090 or ENG 091 or EAP 093 or higher, SSC 100 or concurrent
Co-Requisites:

none

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
0.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course focuses on the organization and operation of government at various levels while emphasizing involvement in the democratic process. It provides a working understanding of the structure and function of the formal political system on the local, state, national, and international levels. This course assists students in clarifying their personal political value system.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Hybrid Course
Online Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Discuss the ideological foundations of American democracy in the United States. (CCC 1, 2)
  2. Outline the development of democratic thought by tracing contributions of major social contract philosophers. (CCC 1, 2)
  3. Identify how the three branches of government evolved, interrelate, and function. (CCC 1, 2)
  4. Describe the factors affecting participation in the political process. (CCC 1, 2)
  5. Analyze the issues of civil liberties, rights, and responsibilities within the diverse socio- political context. (CCC 1, 2)
  6. Express the interrelationship of international and national political issues. (CCC 1, 2)
  7. Describe an interdisciplinary perspective that may apply to contemporary socio-economic and political problems. (CCC 1, 2)
  8. Formulate and express opinions of the American political process both orally and in writing. (CCC 1, 2)
  9. Critically evaluate different approaches to the study of political science. (CCC 1, 2, 5)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Discuss the ideological foundations of American democracy in the United States.
    1. Discuss the concept of the fundamental dilemma of government.
    2. Identify and discuss the ideological foundations of American democracy.
    3. Describe the theories of government and the resultant compromises that created the American democracy.
  2. Outline the development of democratic thought by tracing contributions of major social contract philosophers.
    1. Name the major social contract philosophers whose work contributed to our democratic process.
    2. Compare and contrast the theories proposed by these social contract philosophers.
  3. Identify how the three branches of government evolved, interrelate, and function.
    1. Name the three branches of the United States federal government.
    2. Discuss the constitutional basis for each branch of government.
    3. List the duties and responsibilities of each branch of government.
    4. Discuss the checks and balances system as it relates to the three branches of government.
  4. Describe the factors affecting participation in the political process.
    1.  Explain how the political socialization process has included certain groups and excluded others.
    2.  List basic factors that affect participation in the political process.
    3.  Discuss ways in which citizens may become active in the political process.
    4. Participate in a political activity at the local, state, or federal level.
  5. Analyze the issues of civil liberties, rights, and responsibilities within the diverse socio-political context.
    1. Explain the concept of civil liberties.
    2. Compile a list of commonly accepted and debated civil liberties.
    3. Discuss both the rights and responsibilities associated with being a citizen of the United States.
  6. Express the interrelationship of international and national political issues.
    1. Explain how discussions and policies made at the national level can affect international decisions and policies.
    2. Cite specific examples of the interrelatedness of national and international policy making.
    3. Discuss in detail the interrelationship of national and international politics regarding a current issue.
  7. Describe an interdisciplinary perspective that may apply to contemporary socio-economic and political problems.
    1. Discuss the meaning of an interdisciplinary perspective.
    2.  Identify a major interdisciplinary perspective used to study socio-economic and political problems.
    3. Select a contemporary socio-economic political issue, and use the interdisciplinary perspective to discuss the issue.
    4. Create a possible solution to a socio-economic political issue.
  8. Formulate and express opinions of the American political process both orally and in writing.
    1. Based upon factors studied, formulate and express a personal opinion of the  American political process.
  9. Critically evaluate different approaches to the study of political science.
    1. Identify and analyze the various perspectives of a current political issue.
    2. Define and discuss the importance of public policy, and explain how it is achieved.
    3. Use critical thinking and problem-solving skills to evaluate the effectiveness of public policy decisions.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

4 Exams @ 15% each

60%

Capstone

15%

Formative Assessments

25%

TOTAL

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

None

Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.