PSY 224 Human Sexuality


Campus Location:
Georgetown, Dover, Stanton, Wilmington
Effective Date:
2020-51
Prerequisite:
ENG 090 or ENG 091
Co-Requisites:

none

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
3.00 lecture hours/week
0.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course examines human sexuality from psychological, biological, behavioral, social, and historical perspectives.  Topics are introduced within an evolutionary and socio-cultural framework to assess factors affecting interpersonal relationships.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

None

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Online Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Describe the nature of human sexuality as a scientific discipline. (CCC 1, 5, 6)
  2. Analyze major theoretical perspectives and themes of human sexuality from biological, behavioral, social, and historical perspectives. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4)
  3. Describe the development, structure, and function of male and female sex organs. (CCC 1, 5)
  4. Describe the processes of childbirth from fertilization to delivery. (CCC 1, 4, 5)
  5. Analyze the various models of sexual response. (CCC 1, 2, 4, 5)
  6. Evaluate the medical and/or psychological causes of major sexual dysfunctions and their treatments. (CCC 1, 2, 4, 5, 6)
  7. Examine gender roles, and compare and contrast gender-type communication and behavior. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
  8. Explore biological and cultural influences on the nature of physical and psychological attraction, sexual orientation, sexual deviance, and sexual coercion. (CCC 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Describe the nature of human sexuality as a scientific discipline.
    1. Evaluate the historical influence of early sexologists, and compare and contrast their methods of sex research.
    2. Examine current research methods in sexuality, and describe the strengths and limitations of each method.
  2. Analyze major theoretical perspectives and themes of human sexuality from biological, behavioral, social, and historical perspectives.
    1. Explain the historical influences on the evolution of sexuality.
    2. Compare and contrast the expression of sexuality across cultures and religious practices.
    3. Trace the biological and evolutionary influences on sexual expression.
  3. Describe the development, structure, and function of male and female sex organs.
    1. Identify and explain the female external and internal sexual organs.
    2. Identify and explain the male external and internal sexual organs.
    3. Explore preventative treatment measures that promote sexual health and wellness.
  4. Describe the process of childbirth from fertilization to delivery.
    1. Describe the independent voyages and first few days after connection of the sperm and ovum.
    2. Trace the physical and psychological changes that occur in the mother and in the baby during each of the three trimesters.
    3.  Indicate the effects of different nutrients and drugs on the developing fetus.
    4. Explain the stages of labor.
    5. Compare and contrast the causes and treatments of infertility.
  5. Analyze the various models of sexual response.
    1. Describe the stages of the sex response, and compare the physiological markers evident at each stage in males and females.
    2. Assess the effects of psychological and emotional influences on the sex response.
    3. Explore the components of spinal cord reflexes, and indicate how these reflexes affect various phases of the sex response.
  6. Evaluate the medical and/or psychological causes for major sexual dysfunctions and their treatments.
    1. Identify and describe each of the major male and female sexual dysfunctions.
    2. Describe how various diseases or drugs affect sexual functioning.
    3. Explain the extent to which learned versus organic factors contribute to the causes of each of the dysfunctions.
    4. Compare and contrast the four different approaches of sex therapy (i.e., behavioral, cognitive-behavioral, couple, and biomedical therapies) in terms of their basic assumptions, treatment procedures, length of treatment, and success rates.
    5. Evaluate the causes and treatments of the most common sexually transmitted diseases.
  7. Examine gender roles, and compare and contrast gender-type communication and behavior.
    1. Examine the cultural and historical influences on socially acceptable sexual behavior for each gender.
    2. Explain the position taken by cognitive, learning, psychoanalytical, and evolutionary theorists regarding the development of sex and gender type behavior. 
    3. Explore the differences noted in the verbal and nonverbal communication of males and females.
  8. Explore biological and cultural influences on the nature of physical and psychological attraction, sexual orientation, sexual deviance, and sexual coercion.
    1. Explain the major theories of interpersonal attraction.
    2. Analyze research regarding the biological and psychological influences of sexual orientation.
    3. Identify and describe the major sexual paraphilia, including potential causes and treatments.
    4. Examine individual and cultural influences on sexual coercion and its consequences.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

Final Course Grade:

Calculated using the following weighted average

Evaluation Measure

Percentage of final grade

5 Exams (Summative) (Equally Weighted)

60%

4 Discussion Forums (Formative) (Equally Weighted)

30%

Other Formative Assessments

10%

Total

100%

Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):

None

Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.