VET 210 Veterinary Clinical Pathology II


Campus Location:
Georgetown
Effective Date:
2018-51
Prerequisite:
VET 140
Co-Requisites:

none

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
2.00 lecture hours/week
7.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course, the second of two courses, provides basic background in veterinary pathology and covers theory and techniques in urinalysis, cytology, parasitology, mycology, and toxicology. Practical application of laboratory skills and use of diagnostic equipment are taught in the clinical session.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

Laboratory coat

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Package, handle, and store specimens for laboratory shipment. (CCC 1; PGC 2)
  2. Identify common internal and external parasites affecting companion animals. (CCC 6; PGC 2)
  3. Identify and discuss the normal and abnormal changes in cells, enzymes, and other substances found in urine as they relate to stress, age, sex, and disease state of dogs and cats. (CCC 6; PGC 1, 2)
  4. Identify common fungi responsible for causing disease in companion animals. (CCC 6; PGC 2)
  5. Perform a variety of collection techniques to obtain cells and/or micro-organisms that aid in the diagnosis of cancer, infectious diseases, and toxicosis. (CCC 2, 5; PGC 2)
  6. Perform a variety of techniques and tests with blood and other body fluid using commercially available veterinary equipment (i.e., chemical analyzer). (CCC 1, 2; PGC 2)
  7. Adhere to the professional behavior and ethics as outlined in the Veterinary Technician Code of Ethics. (CCC 3, 4; PGC 3)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Package, handle, and store specimens for laboratory shipment.
    1. Prepare a specimen for shipment following diagnostic laboratory instructions.
    2. Handle, label, and store a specimen appropriately to avoid contamination or inaccurate results.
    3. Complete online and/or hard copy laboratory submission forms appropriately.
    4. Implement quality control, sanitation, and safety procedures (i.e., gloves) when handling urine, blood, and feces.
    5. Dispose of hazardous waste and other material appropriately.
  2. Identify common internal and external parasites affecting companion animals.
    1. Identify infestational mites, lice, fleas, and ticks of veterinary importance.
    2. Identify infectious cestodes and nematodes of veterinary importance.
    3. Describe the life cycle of common parasites as it relates to prevention and treatment.
    4. List the active ingredient, mechanism of action, and potential side effects of over-the-counter (OTC) and/or prescription heartworm and flea preventatives.
    5. Indicate parasites that can infect humans (zoonosis), and discuss ways to minimize and/or prevent exposure.
    6. Identify and describe blood parasites (i.e., Dirofilaria ) that affect dogs and cats.
    7. Perform a variety of tests to aid in the diagnosis of parasites.
  3. Identify and discuss the normal and abnormal changes in cells, enzymes, and other substances found in urine as they relate to stress, age, sex, and disease state of dogs and cats.
    1. Perform a manual urinalysis.
    2. Perform an automated urinalysis using commercially available equipment.
    3. Identify casts, crystals, and other substances in urine, and discuss cause and implications to the health of the animal.
  4. Identify common fungi responsible for causing disease in companion animals.
    1. Compare and contrast dermatophytes, yeasts, and candidiasis in regard to species affected, distribution, and identification method.
    2. Perform a dermatophyte test medium (DTM).
    3. Recognize fungal diseases that are potentially zoonotic, and implement safety procedures when handling.
  5. Perform a variety of collection techniques to obtain cells and/or micro-organisms that aid in the diagnosis of cancer, infectious diseases, and toxicosis.
    1. Perform a variety of techniques to diagnose bacteria in urine, blood, and other body fluid.
    2. Perform a variety of techniques (i.e., fine needle aspiration) to obtain cells for microscopic examination.
    3. List and describe the criteria for malignancy.
    4. Define benign, malignant, and metastatic as they apply to cancer cells.
    5. Compare and contrast sarcoma and carcinoma.
    6. Research which organs/tissues are required by laboratories to diagnose common toxins.
  6. Perform a variety of techniques and tests with blood and other body fluid using commercially available veterinary equipment (i.e., chemical analyzer).
    1. Perform quality control on a variety of in-house diagnostic equipment.
    2. Describe common laboratory errors, and discuss ways to troubleshoot those errors.
    3. Implement safety practices using diagnostic equipment.
  7. Adhere to the professional behavior and ethics as outlined in the Veterinary Technician Code of Ethics.
    1. Work effectively in groups of people from diverse backgrounds and beliefs.
    2. Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior and conduct.
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

 
Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Apply theoretical information that leads to appropriate action in the application or delivery of veterinary nursing procedures.
  2. Competently perform a full range of veterinary nursing procedures used in small and large animal medicine.
  3. Practice behaviors that are consistent with the Veterinary Technology Code of Ethics and employer expectations/requirements.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.