VET 224 Large Animal and Equine Nursing and Health Management


Campus Location:
Georgetown
Effective Date:
2018-51
Prerequisite:
VET 221, VET 220, VET 210
Co-Requisites:

none

Course Credits and Hours:
3.00 credits
2.00 lecture hours/week
7.00 lab hours/week
Course Description:

This course focuses on nursing care and health and disease of food animals and equine. This course introduces techniques and health management that a technician is expected to provide in a large animal veterinary practice. Common diseases of livestock and equine, basic therapeutics or diagnostic approaches, and vaccinations are discussed. The clinical session provides the student with the opportunity to perform basic techniques, including venipuncture, bandaging, physical examination, and medicating cattle, sheep, and horses.

Required Text(s):

Obtain current textbook information by viewing the campus bookstore online or visit a campus bookstore. Check your course schedule for the course number and section.

Additional Materials:

Stethoscope, watch with second hand and paddock boots or other protective shoes

Schedule Type:
Classroom Course
Disclaimer:

None

Core Course Performance Objectives (CCPOs):
  1. Identify infectious and noninfectious diseases and parasites of livestock and equine. (CCC 5; PGC 1)
  2. Describe husbandry, management, and medical care requirements of livestock and equine. (CCC 5; PGC 1)
  3. List potential public health concerns in regard to food and milk safety, extra- and off-label drug use, and meat and milk withdraw times. (CCC 1, 3, 5, 6; PGC 1, 3)
  4. Perform a variety of veterinary nursing techniques on cattle, sheep, and goats. (CCC 2, 6; PGC 1, 3)
  5. Adhere to the professional behavior and ethics as outlined in the Veterinary Technician Code of Ethics. (CCC 3, 4; PGC 3)

See Core Curriculum Competencies and Program Graduate Competencies at the end of the syllabus. CCPOs are linked to every competency they develop.

Measurable Performance Objectives (MPOs):

Upon completion of this course, the student will:

  1. Identify infectious and noninfectious diseases and parasites of livestock and equine.
    1. Identify etiology and pathogenesis of common diseases of livestock and equine.
    2. Describe the impact of parasites on production and performance of large animals.
    3. Identify cestodes, nematodes, and trematodes of large animals, and discuss treatment and prevention.
    4. Identify mite, lice, tick, and fly infestations of large animals, and discuss the treatment protocols.
    5. List metabolic diseases associated with the dairy cow.
  2. Describe husbandry, management, and medical care requirements of livestock and equine.
    1. Design a large animal facility that minimizes disease transmission.
    2. Identify signs of stress and disease in large animals.
    3. Prepare a healthcare plan, including vaccination and deworming for large animals.
    4. Describe nutritional requirements of large animals at different ages and stages of production.
    5. Identify common roughages and concentrates fed to large animals.
    6. List common toxins, and discuss treatment options.
  3. List potential public health concerns in regard to food and milk safety, extra- and off-label drug use, and meat and milk withdraw times.
    1. Define off-label, extra-label, and withdraw time as they apply to large animal medication.
    2. Research meat and milk withdraw times of common drugs used in dairy practice using the Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database (FARAD) website.
    3. Discuss the role of the Food and Drug Agency (FDA), the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National and State Dairy Herd Improvement Association (DHIA), and other regulatory agencies in large animal practice.
    4. Indicate normal somatic cell counts (SCC) of bulk tanks in Delaware dairies.
  4. Perform a variety of veterinary nursing techniques on cattle, sheep, and goats.
    1. Demonstrate safety precautions when working with large animals.
    2. Exhibit different ways to physically restrain a large animal.
    3. Perform a physical examination, and record findings.
    4. Perform intramuscular injections, subcutaneous injections, and venipuncture in cattle.
    5. Perform intramuscular injections, intravenous injection, and venipuncture in the horse.
    6. Perform venipuncture in sheep.
    7. Demonstrate basic care and therapeutic techniques, including bandaging, hoof trimming, and grooming of large animals.
  5. Adhere to the professional behavior and ethics as outlined in the Veterinary Technician Code of Ethics.
    1. Work effectively in groups of people from diverse backgrounds and beliefs.
    2. Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior and conduct. 
Evaluation Criteria/Policies:

Students must demonstrate proficiency on all CCPOs at a minimal 75 percent level to successfully complete the course. The grade will be determined using the Delaware Tech grading system:

92 100 = A
83 91 = B
75 82 = C
0 74 = F

Students should refer to the Student Handbook for information on the Academic Standing Policy, the Academic Integrity Policy, Student Rights and Responsibilities, and other policies relevant to their academic progress.

 
Core Curriculum Competencies (CCCs are the competencies every graduate will develop):
  1. Apply clear and effective communication skills.
  2. Use critical thinking to solve problems.
  3. Collaborate to achieve a common goal.
  4. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct.
  5. Use information literacy for effective vocational and/or academic research.
  6. Apply quantitative reasoning and/or scientific inquiry to solve practical problems.
Program Graduate Competencies (PGCs are the competencies every graduate will develop specific to his or her major):
  1. Apply theoretical information that leads to appropriate action in the application or delivery of veterinary nursing procedures.
  2. Competently perform a full range of veterinary nursing procedures used in small and large animal medicine.
  3. Practice behaviors that are consistent with the Veterinary Technology Code of Ethics and employer expectations/requirements.
Disabilities Support Statement:

The College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Students are encouraged to schedule an appointment with the campus Disabilities Support Counselor to request an accommodation needed due to a disability. A listing of campus Disabilities Support Counselors and contact information can be found at the disabilities services web page or visit the campus Advising Center.

Minimum Technology Requirements:
Minimum technology requirements for online, hybrid, video conferencing and web conferencing courses.